3DPOD Episode 14: Consumer and Affordable 3D Printers

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This 3DPod Episode is filled with opinion. Here we look at our favorite affordable desktop 3D printers. We evaluate what we want to see in a printer and how far these machines have come. There is a new emerging category of printers priced from around $100 to $800 that are increasingly being sold in their thousands. With these machines, there is definitely some “buyer beware” to consider. But, even though some have caught flames these low-cost machines are opening up 3D printing to tens of thousands of new users. Do you agree with our choices of which printers we like? What other ones did we forget? Many of the 3D printers discussed here can be found in the 2019 3D printing buying guide.

Velo3D’s Zach Murphy talks about Velo’s technology and development.

We interview Formalloy’s Melanie Lang on directed energy deposition.

Greg Paulsen of Xometry talks to us about 3D printing applications.

Here we discuss 3D Printing in space.

We interview pioneering designer Scott Summit as he crosses Amsterdam on a bicycle.

Janne is another pioneering designer in 3D Printing.

3D Printing in Medicine.

3D Printed Guns.

Interview with 3D Scanning pioneer Michael Raphael.

3D Printers in the classroom, panacea or not?

The Fourth Industrial Revolution, what is happening now?

We’re all going to live forever with bioprinting.

The first episode: Beyond PLA.

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3D Printed Guns


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