The Bioprinting Zone

A Bioprinting World Map

With 109 established bioprinting companies and many entrepreneurs around the world showing interest in the emerging field, it’s just a matter of time before it becomes one of the most sought after technologies. Mapping the companies that make up this industry is a good starting point to understand the bioprinting ecosystem, determine where most companies have established their headquarters and learn more about potential hubs, like the one in San Francisco.

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A bioprinting world map

3D Systems


Bioprinting 101

Comprehensive bioprinting guide.


Bioprinting 101 Part 18 – Pharmaceutical Testing

A pharmaceutical test can be referred to as a clinical trial or a rigorously controlled test of a new drug or a new invasive medical device on human subjects. In…

Bioprinting 101 – Part 17, Stem Cells

Mesenchymal Stem Cell Stem cells have been an interesting topic within the medical field for ages. There lies a certain polarizing feel when one talks about the use of stem…

Bioprinting 101 – Part 16, Microfluidics

Microfluidic Process We have previously mentioned the topic of microfluidics within this series of articles. Microfluidics deals with the behavior, precise control, and manipulation of fluids that are geometrically constrained…

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Round-up: Bioprinting, Dental and Medical

Discover the latest articles on bioprinting, dental and medical from the 3DPrint.com team.


Germany’s Rapid Shape Brings Automated 3D Printing to North Carolina

While not as well-known in the U.S., German 3D printer manufacturer Rapid Shape has a unique approach to vat photopolymerization that may actually be more advanced than most products on…

Looking to Dominate Medical 3D Printing, Formlabs Appoints President of Healthcare

From Kickstarter to a president of Healthcare, it has been a heady journey for professional desktop 3D printing company Formlabs. The company announced that Guillaume Bailliard is to be its…

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e-NABLE

e-NABLE is an online global community of “Digital Humanitarian” volunteers from all over the world who are using their 3D printers to make free and low-cost prosthetic upper limb devices for children and adults in need.

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