Incredible Scaled Model of Ducati 1199 Superbike 3D Printed on Ultimaker in 40 Pieces

Share this Article

If you are a sports bike or superbike enthusiast, then you have likely heard of the Ducati 1199. The Italian made machine weighs just 362 pounds, and packs a whopping 171.8 horsepower into its 1,198 cc engine. It can accelerate from 0-60 mph in under 3 seconds flat, and certainly isn’t hard on the eye either.

Jacky Wan (aka Valcrow)

Jacky Wan (aka Valcrow)

If you were to create a 3D model, and then print out a scaled replica of any object in the world, this bike would probably rank up there as one of the most difficult. The tiny parts, suspended pieces, intricate chain, and small attachment points would be a formidable task for even the most experienced of designers. Obviously it was not daunting enough for Jacky Wan (aka Valcrow) from Redicubricks.com. Jacky, who writes monthly guest blog posts for Ultimaker.com, decided to take on the challenge.

3D printed model of the Ducati 1199 on the Ultimaker Oiginal 3D Printer

3D printed model of the Ducati 1199 on the Ultimaker Oiginal 3D Printer

“The Ducati Superbike project was an ambitious one. It is perhaps the most complex FDM printing challenge I’ve tackled in the shortest amount of time with the most unknowns,” stated Jacky. “On the onset, this project didn’t seem that different. But the challenges readily became apparent during the design process.”

Before he got started he agreed to a set of self-imposed guidelines for his model, which were as follows:

  1. Be as true as possible to the original design on the exterior.
  2. Printable on my Ultimaker Original with no supports (where possible)
  3. Snap fit so that it could be easily glued.
  4. No excess seams or grooves

To get started, Jacky began by slowly creating a 3D model of the entire bike with the correct dimensions, but initially ignored any possible printing issues that the model may have thrown at him. Jacky said that once this step was complete, it b6acted as a confidence booster for the more daunting tasks about to be tackled.

The model next had to be separated into 40 different pieces, which all snapped together. Then the optimization had to take place. What’s the best print direction for each piece? Are all the pieces watertight and free of STL errors? All these questions had to be thoroughly answered before the printing process could begin.

To meet his time constraints, he would perfect one piece of the model, and as that piece was printing move on to the next. Piece by piece the Ducati 1199 began to come together.

“Having this many parts created unique challenges as I had to design components to be forward compatible with any interconnects I was planning to make,” explained Jacky. “So b2in my mind, I was a few pieces ahead of my designing, which was ahead of modeling, which was ahead of my printing. It was a lot to keep track of.”

Because of the rounded shape of the front windshield of the bike, Jacky was forced to have to use supports, breaking one of the guidelines he originally set for himself. One of the things that surprised Jacky the most was how well the tiny, intricate chain turned out on his Ultimaker 3D printer. The chain wasn’t the only thing that came out looking incredible though. After all the parts were painted with enamels, acrylics and lacquer paints, the thing looked spectacular. What’s even cooler, is that you too can create your very own scaled model of the Ducati 1199. Jacky has made all the design files publicly available at YouMagine for free!

If you do happen to undertake this complex project like Jacky did, please feel free to post your experience and photos in the 3D printed Ducati 1199 forum thread on 3DPB.com. Check out some more incredible images of the model below.

b-1

b4

b5

b6

[Source: Ultimaker]

Share this Article


Recent News

AMS 2020: Panels on 3D Printing in Implants and Orthopedics, Regulation in Additive Medical Devices

Next Chapter Manufacturing: Redesigning Injection Molding with 3D Printing



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

3D Printing for Molds and Dies, Part 2

In part one of this series, we gave an overview of how 3D printing is used to fabricate molds and dies for injection molding and die casting. In particular, additive...

3D Printing for Molds and Dies, Part 1

As adoption of 3D printing spreads throughout the larger sector of industrial manufacturing, the value of the technology as more than just a rapid prototyping tool is becoming increasingly evident....

The State of 3D Printing in Industrial Goods, Part Four

In the previous installment in our series on the use of 3D printing in the industrial goods sector, we discussed some general trends, as well as the key manufacturers of...

The State of 3D Printing in Industrial Goods, Part Three

After exploring the users of 3D printing in the industrial goods segment, as well as service bureaus that are producing some of those goods, we’ll now be taking a look...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.


Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our 3DPrint.com.

You have Successfully Subscribed!