3D Printed ‘Ivy’ and ‘Armure’ Clutches Draw Inspiration from Nature and Geometry

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Odo Fioravanti is intrigued by nature and its unexpected relationship with a classic geometric form, an Archimedean solid. His new ‘Ivy’ clutch, designed for maison 203, takes the truncated icosahedral structure of a soccer ball and translates it into a very functional-looking handbag. The truncated icosahedron is a solid made of hexagonal and pentagonal faces, and is one of the most intriguing solids; it is known as Archimedean or semi-regular. I recently reported on how artists Dario Santacroce and  Ashley Zelinskie are using classical geometric forms in their respective works. It seems some things never go out of style.

Not only does the ‘Ivy’ clutch draw inspiration from classical geometric forms, but it is equally influenced by illustrations from early botanical explorers, the plant hunters who were on tireless quests to find undiscovered flowers and plants. These two seemingly disparate forces, nature and mathematics, informed Fioravant’s design of the ‘Ivy’ clutch. He wanted to explore how disc-shaped surfaces on an icosahedral structure could intersect to create a new stellated solid. The result was unexpected. As the artist notes:

“It happens that the overlapping surfaces of the clutch turn into leaves and become the key in the pattern that verges on the hypnotic, that draws circles and hexagonal leafy branches. a happy rhythm that reminds of the fascination of the tropics.”

The leaves also function to hide the edge where the two halves of the bag meet. To the beholder it appears to be a solid object.

The discs on the icosahedral structure expand and intersect creating the leaves

This is not his first 3D printed clutch. Last year, Fioravanti created the ‘Armure’ cutch, also for maison 203. Fioravanti’s ‘Armure’ is a 3D printed clutch that is inspired to the shape of the cypress fruits.

According to Fioravanti, “The small spherical pinecones are characterised by a hidden soul, on which raised plates seem to float, like parts of an armour separated by thin gaps. The two overlapping layers create a depth effect and the clutch is reinforced by this gentle elastic armour, a sort of exoskeleton made possible by 3D printing.”

What do you think of these 3D printed clutches? I’d love to hear your thoughts! Tell us over in the 3D Printed Clutches forum at 3DPB.com.

Below are some more images of the ‘Ivy’ clutch:

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