Massivit’s Big 3D Printing Technology Gets Bigger in the Big Apple

Share this Article

The Massivit 1800 3D printer is ultra large and ultra fast

The Massivit 1800 3D printer is ultra large and ultra fast

Israel-based Massivit, a young company specializing in ultra-fast, ultra-large 3D printing for visual merchandising, has a good lead in this new, rapidly growing area of interest for 3D printing. Massivit is now exporting its proprietary GDP (Gel Deposition Printing) technology to the US through a distribution deal signed with NYC-based Carisma.

The first Massivit 1800 system has just been installed at the large format media specialist in Brooklyn, NY and has immediately gone into production creating unique promotions primarily for buses. Over the past 20 years, Carisma has grown from a large format printer and installer in Brooklyn to becoming a key player in the marketing and experiential industry nationwide, with a specific focus on the double decker bus market and food trucks nationwide.

“We are happy to see how a print service provider like Carisma is putting the Massivit 1800 to work in the advertising world, and by doing this will expand its envelope of performances to new applications and in new ways,” says Avner Israeli, Massivit 3D CEO. “The team at Carisma has, as their name suggests, has a lot of charisma and is driving the industry to great heights. Three-dimensional advertisements on buses, no doubt, are going to be a big hit”.

CARISMA 3DThe Massivit 1800 3D printer is set to transform the way special marketing, advertising and themed environments are created, by adding a new dimension at unprecedented prices (thanks to Massivit’s proprietary Dimengel printing material) and speeds (up to 1000 mm/s for two printing heads) that are superior to anything else in the 3D printing industry. It does this by combining a gel extrusion system with a UV curing setup which means all parts are built with a precise and yet cold process.

It can be used for really large visual merchandising props made on-demand

It can be used for really large visual merchandising props made on-demand

Carisma’s unique campaign currently involves wrapping buses in vinyl graphics. The company will now put the Massivit 1800 printer to work in order to enhance this service.

“As always, I was looking for the next big thing, for a technology edge that can help me bring something different to my customers. That can let me help my customers in creating memorable and noticeable advertising,” said Moshe Gil, Carisma owner & CEO. “We were the first to put LED screens on buses for advertising, we are one of the first who printed to lenticular lenses and placed them on buses and now we will be the first to have 3D on buses.”

“I visited Massivit in Israel and saw their system in action,” Gil continued, “and it was magic. I immediately knew, this is what I need for my customers. 3D printing is definitely the future and I wanted to be the first who steps into this future. I am thrilled that Carisma will be the first in the Western Hemisphere to offer this technology.”

The Massivit 1800 can 3D print objects up to 1.8m / 6ft high and grow them at up to 35cm / 1ft per hour. The system is also equipped with dual process option which allows for easy printing of two different objects in parallel. Last, but not least, it offers economical 3D printing as its special software features and its’ ‘support-less’ printing results in fairly low material consumption. It allows print service providers, scenic fabricators and 3D service bureaus to produce unique, customized, unmatched large format 3D figures for a variety of uses for advertising, events design, theming of environments and more. We are certainly gong to see a lot more of this. The Big Apple can be now be 3D printed even bigger.

Share this Article


Recent News

4D Printing in Singapore: Researchers Pair Compliant Mechanisms with Chitosan Biopolymers

HP and NTU Singapore Officially Open Joint Corporate 3D Printing Lab



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

3D Printing News Briefs: January 22, 2020

In today’s 3D Printing News Briefs, we’ve got a 2019 recap, a new 3D printing conference, a new 3D printer, and a 3D printed medicine story. Prusa is sharing how...

Victrex and University of Exeter Commission EOS P 810 to Commercialize PAEK Materials

Back in the summer of 2018, high-performance polymer solutions provider Victrex, based in the UK, announced that it had developed new PAEK 3D printing materials. PAEK, or polyaryletherketone, is a family...

Sponsored

3D Printing Is Ready for Manufacturing Primetime—Are We?

When the World Economic Forum reported that the value to society and industry of digital transformation across industries could exceed $100 trillion—yes, trillion—by 2025, we knew that wouldn’t happen without...

3D Printing News Briefs: December 15, 2019

In this edition of 3D Printing News Briefs, it’s business, business, and then an upcoming event. 3D Alliances signed a collaboration agreement with Xact Metal. Sigma Labs has appointed a...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.


Services & Data

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our 3DPrint.com.

You have Successfully Subscribed!