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Impossible Objects’ CBAM Pilot Project

INTAMSYS industrial 3d printing

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Impossible Objects’ composite-based additive manufacturing (CBAM) technique uses conventional thermal inkjet heads to print individual layers on sheets of composite materials, including carbon fiber, Kevlar or fiberglass. The sheet is then coated with powdered polymers like nylon or PEEK, which sticks to the still-wet pattern printed in inkjet fluids. Just as with a 2D printer or copier, each layer of the 3D object is printed off individually. Once the excess powder materials are vacuumed off, the sheets are stacked in order before being compressed and heated until the powder melts, which binds the patterns together to form a fully-solid part.

Read more about the CBAM 3D printing process at 3DPrint.com: https://3dprint.com/173381/impossible-objects-model-one/

[Video: Impossible Objects]

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