Exone end to end binder jetting service

Build Your Own Plastic Shredder For Turning Waste in 3D Printer Filament

INTAMSYS industrial 3d printing

Share this Article

FT7V1MLIAHPBAH5.MEDIUMDavid Watkins is a Pennsylvanian maker and 3D printing enthusiast who’s skilled in electronics, mechanics, kinematics, and data analysis, and he wanted to take on a problem he faced after purchasing his printer – the ongoing cost of materials.

Watkins says that while 3D printers continue to decrease in cost, “purchasing plastic filament still remains a costly affair.”

FH8HT28IAHPBAIM.MEDIUMHe was taken by the ongoing efforts in the 3D printing community to produce filament, and he was struck by the number of companies and individuals who have designed filament extruders. He believes that at some point, there will be “settings and methods for printing (which) will allow for almost any type of plastic to be used, making any recyclable plastic a source of printing material.”

“If a person could shred waste plastic or failed prints to feed into an extruder, the cost of printing material would be greatly reduced,” Watkins says. “Searching the internet reveals some impressive and well-built plastic shredders, but the complexity and cost are significant.”

So Watkins took on the task of building and documenting “a proof-of-concept of a simple, low-cost, hand-operated plastic shredder for starting the process of reusing waste plastic for printing.”

Most of the structure of the shredder is composed of wood, and a few pieces of pipe and some readily available tools are about all you need to make it happen in your own garage or workshop.

It’s a pretty simple design in which two pieces of steel pipe are set up coaxial and used as the cutting mechanism. As the outer cylinder remains fixed in place, the inner cylinder rotates within it and a slot cut into both cylinders acts as both a blade and a hopper. By mounting the cylinders on an incline, Watkins says the milled pieces can fall through the cylinders and into a collection container.

According to Watkins, the whole project’s tools and materials are so cost-effective the project can effectively be free, or very close to it:

“Depending on what tools and materials you have on hand, or your level of resourcefulness, this device can be built for anywhere from free, to about $30!”

You can check out Watkins’ Instructable project here for full details on how to create your own shredder.

Image 71Will you use David Watkins’ design for a plastic shredder or can you refine his idea for a design of your own? Let us know in the Home Built Plastic Shredder forum thread on 3DPB.com.

 

Share this Article


Recent News

3D Printing News Briefs, September 18, 2021: Business, Materials, & More

3D Printing Service Hubs Appoints New CEO, Alex Cappy



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

Metal 3D Printing: Kennametal Offers Binder Jet Tungsten Carbide

Kennametal has launched its KAR85-AM-K, tungsten carbide for binder jetting. The material, which is comparable to its existing CN13S Co-Ni-Cr powder, is tough, hard-wearing and ideal for wear-resistant parts and...

Ahead of Public Listing, New Members Join VELO3D Board

VELO3D announced the addition of three new board members ahead of its highly anticipated public listing on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) under the new ticker symbol “VLD.” The...

Featured

3D Systems Acquires Oqton to Drive 3D Printing for Production

In the AM industry’s second acquisition of the day, 3D Systems (NYSE:DDD) now has an agreement to acquire software startup Oqton, a global SaaS company founded by manufacturing and artificial intelligence...

Featured

Desktop Metal Adds Hydraulics 3D Printing to Portfolio with Aidro Acquisition

Massachusetts-based metal 3D printing leader Desktop Metal (NYSE: DM), which went public via a SPAC deal in December of 2020, has been announcing a string of industry acquisitions since then,...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.