Build Your Own Plastic Shredder For Turning Waste in 3D Printer Filament

RAPID

Share this Article

FT7V1MLIAHPBAH5.MEDIUMDavid Watkins is a Pennsylvanian maker and 3D printing enthusiast who’s skilled in electronics, mechanics, kinematics, and data analysis, and he wanted to take on a problem he faced after purchasing his printer – the ongoing cost of materials.

Watkins says that while 3D printers continue to decrease in cost, “purchasing plastic filament still remains a costly affair.”

FH8HT28IAHPBAIM.MEDIUMHe was taken by the ongoing efforts in the 3D printing community to produce filament, and he was struck by the number of companies and individuals who have designed filament extruders. He believes that at some point, there will be “settings and methods for printing (which) will allow for almost any type of plastic to be used, making any recyclable plastic a source of printing material.”

“If a person could shred waste plastic or failed prints to feed into an extruder, the cost of printing material would be greatly reduced,” Watkins says. “Searching the internet reveals some impressive and well-built plastic shredders, but the complexity and cost are significant.”

So Watkins took on the task of building and documenting “a proof-of-concept of a simple, low-cost, hand-operated plastic shredder for starting the process of reusing waste plastic for printing.”

Most of the structure of the shredder is composed of wood, and a few pieces of pipe and some readily available tools are about all you need to make it happen in your own garage or workshop.

It’s a pretty simple design in which two pieces of steel pipe are set up coaxial and used as the cutting mechanism. As the outer cylinder remains fixed in place, the inner cylinder rotates within it and a slot cut into both cylinders acts as both a blade and a hopper. By mounting the cylinders on an incline, Watkins says the milled pieces can fall through the cylinders and into a collection container.

According to Watkins, the whole project’s tools and materials are so cost-effective the project can effectively be free, or very close to it:

“Depending on what tools and materials you have on hand, or your level of resourcefulness, this device can be built for anywhere from free, to about $30!”

You can check out Watkins’ Instructable project here for full details on how to create your own shredder.

Image 71Will you use David Watkins’ design for a plastic shredder or can you refine his idea for a design of your own? Let us know in the Home Built Plastic Shredder forum thread on 3DPB.com.

 

Share this Article


Recent News

3DPOD Episode 199: Collaborative Design with Graham Bredemeyer, CEO of CADchat

Manufacturing World Tokyo 2024 Set to Showcase Innovation in AM, 3D Printing and More!



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

Featured

Industrial Giant Ingersoll Rand Leads $19M Round Backing Inkbit’s AI-Driven 3D Printing

Inkbit, the Massachusetts-based original equipment manufacturer (OEM) of multi-material, AI-integrated 3D printers, has closed a $19 million financing round. Ingersoll Rand, a US giant in the industrial equipment sector, led...

Advanced Manufacturing Equipment Sourcing Platform Diagon Raises $5.1M in Seed Round

Diagon, a Silicon Valley-based startup offering an AI-backed software platform for sourcing advanced manufacturing equipment, has raised $5.1 million in a seed round backed by firms including Valia Ventures and...

3D Printing News Briefs, April 13, 2024: Robotics, Orthotics, & Hypersonics

In 3D Printing News Briefs today, we’re focusing first on robotics, as Carnegie Mellon University’s new Robotics Innovation Center will house several community outreach programs, and Ugogo3D is now working...

MIMO TECHNIK, ASTRO Test Lab & LEAP 71 Combine Powers for Computational Engineering in Aerospace 3D Printing

California-based MIMO TECHNIK, a service bureau catering to demanding clients in the New Space and defense sectors, operates with six SLM 500s, four SLM 280s, and three SLM 125s. ASTRO...