MXd3D Now Has a Template Marketplace – Thanks to multiple acquisitions

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maker6.mxd3d.com

maker6.mxd3d.com

MXd3D, a 3D printing startup now based in California, begun as a web-based software that allowed 3D designers to upload their work and verify that their design would come out right. Now, the company has bought three websites from which it is possible to buy 3D designs and templates.  MXd3D also has a network of 3D printers across the world, meaning that anyone can simply buy the template of the thing they would like to print, then find a printer in their neighborhood and get the final product printed out right away.

MXd3D has already integrated the three websites it has acquired into its own. The three template websites were maker6.com, makerpicks.com, and 3Dhippy.com. Now these addresses all redirect to the MXd3D.com domain.

The marketplaces acquired by MXd3D already have hundreds of templates of many different items, ranging from iPhone cases, medical devices, and special eccentric earrings, to Batman action figures, Playstation PSP shade tools and GoPro bicycle and motorcycle mounts.

Acquiring these websites also allow people to sell their own templates and profit from them through MXd3D. According to cofounder Muhannad Taslaq, in an interview with VentureBeat, the move is a way for MXd3D to work with both specific software and a marketplace for users to interact on.

A few examples of the available templates

A few examples of the available templates

MXd3D is calling this “end-to-end” 3D printing:  It’s possible to design; interact with experienced designers; browse, buy and sell templates and designs; verify if templates and designs are structurally well designed; and find where it’s possible to print said designs.

The MXd3D marketplace allows designers to simply upload their designs, work on them, organize them in albums and allows members to browse through them. Members can then follow their favorite designers. It’s also possible for members and designers to send each other private messages and, potentially, collaborate and write to each other.

MXd3D is an easy-to-use 3D design software and tool that can be used through the web. It garnered a lot of attention last month in the media when it launched the software. It has many interesting features, including automatic structural correction, printer-ready conversion, and is said to be “as easy as using a pencil and drawing on a screen”, according to Taslaq. There are many video tutorials that can help users understand how to use the multiple powerful tools available to them. The video explaining the marketplace is thorough and well designed.  Do you use or intend on using this marketplace.  Let us know in the MXd3D forum thread at 3DPB.com.

[source: VentureBeat]

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