AMS Spring 2023

Researchers Address Benefits and Pitfalls in 3D Printing of Tissue

Inkbit

Share this Article

Authors Jesse K. Placone, Bhushan Mahadik, and John P. Fisher explore the benefits and challenges of tissue engineering. In the recently published ‘Addressing present pitfalls in 3D printing for tissue engineering to enhance future potential,’ the authors also address the future potential for 3D printing, and accompanying materials and techniques.

Noting that bioprinting is intrinsically limited due to the difficulty in sustaining human tissue, the authors explore how obstacles can be overcome, as well as the potential for use in ‘academic, clinical, and commercial settings.’ Many researchers today are also focused on tissue engineering for cells to be used both in vitro and in vivo. Due to challenges with size, nutrients for cells, and waste diffusion, many studies today are centered around creating microvasculature.

Popular materials for use in bioprinting are polycaprolactone (PCL), poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), and polystyrene (PS), along with a variety of bioinks, and a range of techniques.

“Particularly, there is a high degree of freedom when 3D printing acellular, single-material constructs with either hydrogels or thermoplastics,” state the authors.

The use of multi-material printing with hybrid bioinks is becoming increasingly popular too, allowing for successful fabrication of bone mimetics, for example, creating rigid support materials as well as softer ones for ‘the desired cellular response.’ While a wide range of research studies have been and are in the process of being performed around the world, there has been particular attention paid to the musculoskeletal system, along with forays into fabrication of cartilage, tendons, skin, applications for wound care, and more.

“Current clinical treatments for skin regeneration focus mainly on the epidermal layer and are unable to capture the intricate neurovascular, follicular, and sebaceous gland architecture of the dermal and hypodermal layer,” state the authors. “Consequently, 3D printing research has aggressively focused on recreating these distinct, yet interconnected layers in order to provide more meaningful clinical treatments and therapies for patients suffering from severe 2nd and 3rd-degree injuries.”

Key steps to generate clinically relevant 3D printed substrates. At each development and fabrication step, researchers need to aid in the development of standards as well as evaluation and characterization methods to ensure repeatability. Consideration needs to be taken with the scale up of each of these steps when transitioning from small scale laboratory settings to larger scale fabrication approaches. Additionally, hands on training and formal education regarding the different parameters that need to be controlled as well as the limitations and constraints on different fabrication strategies will be critical for the continuous adoption of this technology as it matures.

The ability to customize nearly any product is one of the greatest benefits to 3D printing, and it translates significantly to the bioprinting realm in allowing for implantation of a patient’s own cells—offering the most patient-specific care possible, and especially in terms of the future for organ transplants.

3D printing is offering tremendous impacts in regenerative medicine too, with possibilities for every organ. Again, while there are inherent challenges when dealing with cells, with time and effort expended toward the study of and sustainability of tissue in the lab, complex structures can be fabricated.

“Researchers should place an emphasis on guiding the field toward developing standard techniques and aid in the adoption of standards of regulatory agencies to provide a framework for clinical translation,” concluded the researchers. “Establishing centers of 3D printing excellence would facilitate the transition from the bench to clinical applications by localizing the expertise and minimizing the logistical problems that may plague individual groups.

“As the field continues to mature, addressing these barriers will enable the transition of 3D printing from niche applications to a more widespread technique for 3D culture, high-throughput screening, and device and implant fabrication.”

What do you think of this news? Let us know your thoughts! Join the discussion of this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com.

[Source / Images: ‘Addressing present pitfalls in 3D printing for tissue engineering to enhance future potential’]

Share this Article


Recent News

Management Drama Continues at Electronics 3D Printing Company Nano Dimension

Rail Giant Alstom Turns to Nexa3D’s NXE 400Pro to 3D Print Replacement Footrests



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

3D Printing News Unpeeled: Dior, Botter and Rains 3D Print Shoes at Paris Fashion Week

Danish brand Rains has made a 3D printed TPU shoe together with Zellerfeld. Zellerfeld is a shoe 3D Printing service. Meanwhile Dior made a powder bed fusion cellular shoe out...

Sponsored

Digitalization and Additive Manufacturing: Leveraging the Real and Digital Worlds

Additive Manufacturing, or industrial 3D printing, has evolved from prototyping with basic materials and equipment to producing low tolerance components with limited use to additive manufacturing as we know it...

US Navy Installs Meltio Hybrid Metal 3D Printer to Reduce Repair Times

In 2022, the USS Essex became the first American Navy warship to install a metal 3D printer to ensure onboard repair capabilities of much-needed tools and parts. Now, the USS...

America Makes Announces the Winners for its 2022 Project Calls

America Makes, a U.S. National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute, recently announced the winners of the 2022 Rapid Innovation Call (RIC) and the Steel (HY-80) Wire-Arc Additive Heat Treatment (SWAAHT) project...