Coding for 3D Part 1: An Introduction

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Hello everyone! I am back with a new series of articles that I will be focusing on within the next month or so. I have gained a lot of inspiration from my previous metrology series and would like to do a more hands on or practical series on coding. This topic is large in nature so it will require different focuses throughout the series. Here is a basic outline of the topics I hope to cover within this series:

  1. What does coding in 3D entail?
  2. What are some ideal coding languages to use for 3-dimensional coding?
  3. What software packages for design integrate well for 3D coding?
  4. Parametric design through code
  5. Organizations that focus on coding and 3D design/printing
  6. What are the benefits of 3D coding?
  7. What are the cons of 3D coding?
  8. What is required from a CPU to do such programs?
  9. Practical step by step coding for 3D objects
  10. Generative 3D design code

Can we code paremetric designs?

My largest goal with this series is being able to create a portfolio of coding projects. I think being able to code is a skill that most journalists should pick up (shoutouts to all the twitter posts oriented towards Huffington post journalists after layoffs saying “learn to code”). More seriously though, I have a bit of coding skill from doing basic scripts, but I’d like to develop a bit more. Being able to code in the 3D realm is of absolute fascination to me. Understanding the intricacies of virtual environments and the physics behind them is essential I am sure. Rotational mathematics will be consistently recurring.

Learn to Code

I consider myself somewhat of an autodidact. When I learn things, I tend to deep dive and look for the exact resources that I need so that I can become proficient and knowledgeable. I am the personality type that embodies the phrase, “just enough knowledge to be dangerous”. I do not expect to be at a level of a software engineer at Autodesk after this, but I do expect to be able to have a conversation with an Autodesk engineer and understand what they’re saying to the point that it helps my projects.

A ton of people fail to learn because they do not take a jump into the unknown. The series of articles I have released so far on 3DPrint.com have been focused on just opening up a bit of my curiosity and plunging forward. It has been extremely exciting to go from bare minimal knowledge, to be somewhat informed. This is a valuable mindset when we are in an era of unlimited knowledge. It takes a certain mindset to look for info and curate it. This is what I am doing with the series I have written so far, and it is what I plan to do continuously.

I am looking for guidance from experts or professionals within this field as well. This will be ideal when I am working through code as well as writing about it. Please do not hesitate to reach out to me through email (esehud (at) gmail.com), so that I can be aware of resources and people within this particular industry. Thanks again and be sure to look out for new articles soon.

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