Impossible Objects Makes Presence Known at RAPID + TCT with CBAM-2 3D Printing System, BASF Collaboration on Materials

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Impossible Objects is a dynamic presence this year participating at RAPID + TCT 2019 in Detroit from May 20-23, as they unveil their new 3D printing system, the CBAM-2, while also embellishing further on their partnership with BASF, manufacturing PA6-carbon fiber composites.

RAPID + TCT attendees will be the first to catch the CBAM-2 3D printing system in action, with availability beginning in the third quarter of this year. Their new hardware is designed for the industrial realm, offering the capability to fabricate complex parts up to ten times faster. Impossible Objects states in a recent press release that their 3D printing users can look forward to parts that are even more lightweight, durable, temperature-resistant, and stronger than components made through traditional techniques.

The CBAM-2 combines high-performance polymers with long-fiber carbon and fiberglass sheets to create composite parts. This new 3D printer also offers the following new features:

  • High production speed – Allowing for high volume of production parts, the CBAM-2 is exponentially faster.
  • High-strength composite support – Unique in printing composite materials no other 3D printer can process, the CBAM-2 also produces stronger, more complex geometries, with high-performance thermoplastics like PEEK and nylon.
  • Large-scale printing – Sheets can be printed up to 12 inches x 12 inches.
  • Precision quality control – Three cameras carefully monitor 3D printing processes.
  • Easy maintenance – Metal powder is automatically filled, and bulk-ink cartridges allow for better efficiency in the manufacturing process.

“It’s been exciting to see how our customers are putting our approach to work to create high-performance parts for everything from aircraft and cars to lightweight athletic gear,” said Impossible Objects Founder and Chairman Bob Swartz. “We’re continuing to bring machines, materials and expertise to the market to transform the entire manufacturing process, from prototyping through to high-volume production.”

The Impossible Objects team offers experience in industries such as materials, aerospace, engineering, additive manufacturing, and new technology commercialization and development. Founded in 2009 with a focus on materials science, Impossible Objects is venture-backed, and recently returned to investors for $4.1 million in funding in a round led by OCA Ventures, bringing total funding to more than $13 million. They also raised $6.4 million in Series A funding in October 2017.

The CBAM-2 3D Printer

The Illinois-based company released their flagship printer, the Model One 3D printer at RAPID 2017, with numerous Fortune 500 companies using it today—to include Ford, the Air Force, and a growing list of industrial clients. In their new partnership with BASF, the Model One will—along with the CBAM-2—support Ultrasint PA6 (polyamide 6) powder for manufacturing high-performance carbon fiber-PA6 composite parts. This new material will also be available for shipment in the third quarter of this year.

“Our collaboration with Impossible Objects opens up new possibilities for customers, especially in the automotive and industrial sectors where we’re seeing strong demand for PA6. This partnership is in line with our philosophy of open innovation and support for open platforms. We’re encouraged by how Impossible Objects is using PA6 and are excited to work together to advance the state of additive manufacturing,” said Kara Noack, regional business director for BASF 3D Printing Solutions.

“We’re honored to be collaborating with BASF 3D Printing Solutions to make this economical workhorse polymer, which is used in an enormous number of industrial applications, available to our customers,” added Bob Swartz of Impossible Objects.

Partnerships abound in the 3D printing industry, and many seem to include BASF, from collaborations in bioprinting to making 3D printed prosthetics to investments in customized eyewear, and even running shoes. What do you think of this news? Let us know your thoughts! Join the discussion of this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com.

Robert Swartz, Chairman and Founder of Impossible Objects, describes PA6 as a ‘workhorse polymer that is used in an enormous number of industrial applications.’ (Clip from video supplied to 3DPrint by Impossible Objects)

[Source / Images: Impossible Objects]

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