BASF & CTIBiotech: Bioprinting Expands to the Sebaceous Glands

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If you are starting to get the impression that there is little researchers and innovators cannot do with 3D printing, you are thinking in the right direction—as are so many companies and organizations today like BASF Care Creations and Cell Therapy Research Institute CTIBiotech. This was obvious after their presence at the recent NYSCC Cosmetic Congress where they came together to present research from a collaboration regarding a stunning new method for bioprinting.

BASF and CTIBiotech have been working together to advance further in skin care applications, now coming forth with technology for the bioprinting of tissue to create sebaceous glands.

“Working with BASF allowed us to validate a powerful technology for human skin care research in very little time. This positions CTIBiotech as a world leader in innovative and even disruptive technologies for human cell-based bioassays, applied to dermo-cosmetics,” said CTIBiotech CEO Dr. Nico Forraz.

[Image: BASF]

For two years the companies have been researching 3D tissue models for testing bio-actives that are appropriate for skin care applications, resulting in the following:

  • Ex vivo production of physiological sebum in a bioprinted culture
  • Regulation of the sebum production with active ingredients

The researchers were able to refine the BASF 3D skin model portfolio further thanks to CTIBiotech’s 3D human sebaceous gland technology, which offers a new way for everyone to study sebaceous glands and how they function—especially in research relevant to skin disorders that may be caused by age or microbial issues or inflammation.

“Compared to current in vitro methods, the 3D models developed by CTIBiotech allow analysis more in touch with human physiology and sebaceous gland metabolism,” said BASF’s project lead Dr. Sabine Pain. “That’s how their technology helps us accelerate the development of innovative and highly reliable ingredients for the skin care market. Our understanding of sebaceous gland metabolism provides the basis for developing and testing advanced cosmetic bio-actives for skincare applications, and in particular skincare products for oily skin.”

CTIBiotech is headquartered in France, and has an intensive focus on specialties in biotechnologies for advancing cancer, stem cell, and tissue engineering research. They also make both in vitro and ex vivo cell models for medical and other research, along with innovative medical devices for cell therapy. BASF is focused on research centered around five segments: chemicals, performance products, functional materials and solutions, agricultural solutions, and oil and gas. This latest collaboration should pave the way for many researchers to move forward into unchartered territory for bioprinting.

“Because of their experience and expertise in developing solutions for the dermo-cosmetics market, BASF understands the benefits of collaborating with tissue engineering experts,” added Professor Colin McGuckin, Chief Scientific Officer and President of CTIBiotech. “The next evolution of the sebaceous gland model will be based on a 3D bio-printing technology that allows us to fully reproduce micro-glands into a full thickness skin model, in vitro.”

BASF has been increasing its work with 3D printing technologies, including study of 3D printed skin and the recent establishment of a dedicated 3D printing business.

What do you think of this news? Let us know your thoughts! Join the discussion of this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts below.

[Source: BASF]

 

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