SmarTech Analysis Reports on Projections for 3D Printed Eyewear Industry from 2019-2028

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SmarTech Analysis is peering into the world of eyewear, with projections for the industry over the next decade in ‘Markets for 3D-Printed Eyewear 2019-2028.’ The company, a leader in commercial analysis, has turned their sights toward additive manufacturing in eyewear, which they predict will grow into an industry of $3.4 billion by 2028. Overall today, the ophthalmic eyewear industry brings in more than $100 billion per year and is growing due to increasing demand for a variety of styles and the obvious new opportunities for frames and glasses that are tailored specifically to consumers.

SmartTech foresees this massive profit potential being driven by final parts production in 3D printing, marking a turning point for the technology’s use in true manufacturing rather than just rapid prototyping with a continued reliance on conventional production techniques. And while eyewear may be only a sliver of what the 3D printing industry will be offering, the forthcoming financial projections show the potential for definite disruption in what has been a very structured business model previously without customers having nearly as much interaction in design, not to mention enjoying drastic speed in turnaround, and in many cases, price.

Current analysis is also designed to give industry stakeholders a summary of what types of technologies exist in additive manufacturing to include a wide range of materials and potential services, of which 3D capturing and online customization will play a major role as consumers seek goods that are made specifically to their needs, and fit. The report also goes into further detail regarding conventional methods such as tooling and casting—along with the benefits of 3D printing at the desktop for both production in volume and prototyping during the design process.

Currently, the most popular technology being used to create eyewear is material jetting, along with 3D printing in metal with powder bed fusion and the use of nylon 12 (PA122) most commonly.

“Vat photopolymerization is also used today mostly for lost wax casting processes (and some part production) while filament extrusion is used for basic desktop prototyping and some end-use internal parts,” said SmarTech in a recent press release.

Highlighted companies in the SmarTech report include Carbon, DWS, EOS, Formlabs, Fuel 3D, Glasses USA; Hoet, Hoya, HP, Luxexcel, Luxottica, Materialise, MONOQOOL, Mykita, Protos, Safilo, Sculpteo, Seiko, Sfered, Sisma, Specsy and more.

Companies like GlassesUSA even allow consumers to 3D print their own eyewear. [Image: GlassesUSA and Sinterit]

Analysis of 3D printing has become almost as popular as the actual innovative activity itself, a technology that lends itself to great fascination regarding the future—and most importantly, outlook and finances for many industries. Eyewear is certainly a market being revolutionized due to the myriad benefits of 3D printing, whether you are an athlete using custom eyewear, a fashion designer creating innovative frames, or a user looking for sunglasses. Find out more about SmartTech and their projections within the 3D printing industry here, and keep an ‘eye’ out here at 3DPrint.com for more on truly progressive frames and glasses.

What do you think of this news? Let us know your thoughts! Join the discussion of this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com.

[Source: SmarTech]

3Dprint.com is an equity holder in SmarTech

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