3D Printing in Metal: Speaker Interview

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Have you signed up for 3D Printing in Metal? The three week online class starts September 18. If you sign up by August 18 you’ll receive an early bird discount — 45 percent savings.

In the interactive course, you’ll have access to presentations from thought leaders like Nick Sondej, application engineer for Markforged.

 

 

 

Speakers include Nick Sondej of Markforged, class sponsor

We asked Nick to share what advancement in 3D printing he’s most excited about.

 What advancement in 3D printing are you most excited about?

“The spread of low cost metal 3D printing is extremely exciting. I think that it’s going to make major impacts as well as have secondary effects on a number of industries, especially manufacturing, in the next few years. My company, Markforged, is readying to release some really performant 3D printable tool steels and more exotic metals like Inconel 625 in the next couple months. We’re seeing massive interest from the manufacturing and aerospace markets already.”

 

Join Nick Sondej for his session Manufacturing: Troubleshooting Your Design and Preparing to Print

“The immediate impact is that we’ll see much faster, lower cost prototyping and iteration of metal parts within days instead of weeks. But it’s the indirect effects that I think are the most interesting. Right now 3D printing is still a bit of a niche process in a lot of manufacturing tooling and R&D efforts. That’s changing, and we’re seeing adoption at an accelerating rate but more often than not, manufacturing companies still design and produce their components with traditional processes like CNC machining. Low cost metal 3D printing with our Metal X is already changing that.

“The indirect effects I’m most excited for are when companies start designing parts specifically to be 3D printed in metal because it’s the most efficient choice. We’re going to see a wave of clever parts that solve engineering challenges in a unique way and can only be 3D printed and, consequently, a huge demand for engineers who understand how to effectively design for 3D printing processes. That demand even trickles down to engineering curriculums, which are already evolving to include much more serious design for 3D printing instruction.”

Want to hear more from leaders like Nick? Sign up today.

You can also check out our other fall classes, Trends & Innovations in Dentistry and 3D Printing for Dental Materials and 3D Printing with Polymers.

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