Titan Robotics Provides a 3D Printed Backdrop for RAPID + TCT, Displays a Next-Generation 3D Printer

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[Image: Sarah Goehrke]

RAPID + TCT has wrapped up for 2018, but there’s still a lot to talk about from the show that ran last week in Fort Worth, Texas. So much was being presented that it was impossible to see it all, though we’ve done our best to bring you as much detail as possible about the 3D printers, software and more that was being introduced and displayed throughout the week.

One company with a lot to show for itself was Titan Robotics. The Colorado Springs company introduced its new pellet extrusion system at RAPID last year, and this year the technology had a starring role throughout the show. RAPID’s keynote speakers spoke at a podium and against a backdrop of 3D printed hexagons, created through Titan’s pellet extrusion technology. The 75 hexagons, which were designed and put together by Go West Creative, lit up for a striking display throughout the conference.

Elsewhere, at the 3D Printing Playground, six colorful mannequins displayed a selection of 3D printed fashion. Those mannequins were also 3D printed using Titan’s pellet extrusion technology, combined with traditional filament extrusion, for a display created in partnership with visual merchandising company Fusion Specialties.

In addition to having its 3D printing technology showcased all over the show floor and conference hall, Titan Robotics had some new merchandise to display at its own booth. The Atlas line of 3D printers was developed in partnership with motion control experts Yaskawa America and combines Titan’s large-format additive manufacturing technology with Yaskawa’s motion control systems. The 3D printers’ technology was drawn from the world of automated industrial machinery and can achieve a print speed of 350 mm per second. When moving between print events, the print head can travel between two precise points at one meter per second.

“We’re really focused on having an accurate, robust machine that can do big parts really quickly and reliably, over and over again,” said Clay Guillory, Titan Robotics Founder and CEO. “Our customers want something they can trust…they can’t afford to waste two weeks of print time on a really large, mission critical part.”

The Atlas

The new 3D printer line utilizes Yaskawa’s servo systems and machine controllers, which are more commonly found in high-end automated factory equipment. Titan Robotics’ unique interface enables real-time feedback and automatic monitoring features, giving the operator increased control and repeatability in 3D printing.

“I think this is a sign that we’re seeing the industry rise to the next stage in its development,” said Kevin Barker, Director of Sales for Yaskawa’s Motion division. “We’re seeing companies like Titan enter the top tier of the business. More of the producers who started at the hobbyist end of the industry are stepping up to create products that outperform the high-cost competitors who once set the standard in this technology.”

The Atlas 3D printer was used to 3D print the hexagons on the keynote stage. Titan Robotics also gave a demonstration of direct pellet fed 3D printing on the Atlas at its booth, using a heated enclosure and enabling 3D printing with a wider range of materials than traditional filament extrusion 3D printing. Sample parts 3D printed with the Atlas were available at the booth, from soft, rubberlike materials to high performance materials, including 50% glass filled nylon and 50% carbon filled PEI.

[Image: Sarah Goehrke]

Discuss this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts below.

[Source/Images (unless otherwise noted): Titan Robotics]

 

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