Stratasys Partnerships Leverage J750 and HP Multi Jet Fusion 3D Printing Technologies

Share this Article

PostNord Strålfors is part of the larger PostNord Group, the leading supplier of communication and logistics solutions in the Nordic region. PostNord Strålfors has operations in Sweden, Norway, Denmark and Finland, and it is the latest company to partner with Stratasys, as the two companies announced this week. Through the collaboration, PostNord Strålfors will use Stratasys’ additive manufacturing solutions for on-demand parts production and delivery service for customers across the PostNord logistics network.

PostNord Strålfors has recognized that customers’ needs are changing, and is working to meet those needs through digitalization. The company already offers 2D printing services, and will now provide on-demand 3D printing services as well. To do so, PostNord Strålfors will purchase a full-color, multi-material Stratasys J750. Support, including machines, service and expertise, will be provided by Stratasys’ regional partner, Protech.

“At PostNord Strålfors, we aim to be our customer’s digitalization partner, and we constantly need to strive for digital developments and explore new business opportunities. In Stratasys, we are working with an industry-leader whose additive manufacturing technologies are proven across a wide range of sectors, and with whom we will grow and evolve,” says Ylva Ekborn, CEO of PostNord Strålfors Group.

“We’re particularly excited to put the new J750 to use – it is the only 3D printer on the market with the capability to create full color, multi-material parts in a single print, enabling us to rapidly produce complex parts and ultimately accelerate the delivery process for our customers. With the dedicated local support from Protech, we plan to quickly integrate this technology within our service offering and have it available to customers soon.”

PostNord Strålfors is the latest logistics company to incorporate 3D printing into its services – UPS and, recently, FedEx have begun offering 3D printing services of their own. It’s a sign that industries like logistics and communications are changing, and that companies are seeing those changing needs and meeting them through new technology.

“PostNord is an expert in the Nordic logistics market and we’re thrilled to be working with them to expand the adoption of our solutions,” said Andy Middleton, President EMEA, Stratasys. “With the help of our local partner, Protech, we will help PostNord and PostNord Strålfors to leverage the advanced capabilities of our additive technologies to address their customers’ needs in the optimal way. In particular, exploring how we can tap into the unique benefits of additive manufacturing for the logistics sector, from accelerating part delivery to reducing supply chains and associated costs. In addition, we also expect to learn from new cases and applications from PostNord’s diverse customer base.”

[Image: Stratasys Direct Manufacturing]

In the meantime, while other companies are adopting Stratasys’ J750 technology, Stratasys Direct Manufacturing is incorporating HP‘s Multi Jet Fusion technology into its 3D printing services. Stratasys Direct Manufacturing is offering the technology after extensive testing to make sure that customers received consistently superior part quality. The high-speed, high-precision technology is well-suited to both serial production for single parts and batch manufacturing, and it lowers costs while delivering parts with higher strength and accuracy than SLS-produced components.

Stratasys Direct Manufacturing is also working with HP on materials development as a beta tester for the new HP 3D High Reusability PA 11, which HP is planning to offer later this year. The Nylon 11 thermoplastic material is highly ductile and impact-resistant, and is designed to produce functional parts for a variety of industries.

Discuss this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts below. 

 

Share this Article


Recent News

Sandvik and BeamIT Bet Big on 3D Printing Superalloys and Aerospace

3D Printing Silk to Make Scaffolds for Regenerative Medicine Research



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

Featured

Researchers Create Bioink that Delivers Oxygen to 3D Printed Tissue Cells

Tissue engineering or regeneration is the process of improving upon or replacing biological tissues by combining cells and other materials with the optimal chemical and physiological conditions in order to build scaffolds...

Magnesium Phosphate Aid Bone Regeneration for 3D Printed Implants

International researchers continue the trend toward overcoming challenges in bone regeneration, sharing the results of their study in the recently published “Tough magnesium phosphate-based 3D-printed implants induce bone regeneration in...

Self-Learning Robot Autonomously Moves Molecules, Setting Stage for Molecular 3D Printing

If you know even just a little bit about science, you probably already know that molecules are often referred to as “the building blocks of life.” Made of a group...

How Do 3D Printed Molds Stack Against Traditional Sand Casting Molds?

Aluminum alloys feature low density, as well as good corrosion resistance and mechanical properties, which is why casting them is an oft-used manufacturing technique. But, defects in molded parts is...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.