Incase Partners with Carbon to 3D Print Lightweight, Durable Mobile Protection Solutions

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In addition to luggage and other bags, California-based company Incase also manufactures camera accessories and protective products for iPhones, Macbooks and more, including sleeves and cases. Incase celebrated its 20-year anniversary last year, and like any successful company, it has been working to keep up with the latest technology as it takes its products deeper into the 21st century. Today, Incase announced that it will be partnering with one of the most advanced 3D printing companies out there, Carbon, and taking advantage of its cutting-edge 3D printing technology to create its mobile device protection solutions.

Incase will use Carbon’s technology to change the material composition and development of its mobile protection products, leading to the first 3D printed mobile protective solutions designed with complex structures in new elastomers at scale.

“With Carbon, we’re rewriting the playbook on device protection, marking a new era in the mobility industry, covering every aspect of the business,” said Andy Fathollahi, Chief Executive Officer, Incase. “In addition to redefining device protection from a material level, our partnership with Carbon significantly changes the mobility space operationally, delivering benefits such as faster go-to market strategies, on-demand supply chain simplification, reduced tooling and prototyping stages and customization opportunities for our customers. Together, we are effectively changing the way mobile device protection will be thought of in the future.”

Incase will use Carbon’s M2 3D printer and Digital Light Synthesis (DLS) technology to create complex lattice structures that are new to mobile protection. Compared to traditional injection molding, DLS allows Incase to create stronger, more lightweight and durable elastomer protective solutions. Incase will also take advantage of Carbon’s programmable materials to create completely customized materials that are not found anywhere else in the mobile protection market today. The materials will be designed specifically for durability and impact absorption, creating unprecedented impact and drop protection.

Carbon’s algorithmic design and simulation software will be key in designing these lightweight but strong and impact-resistant protection solutions. Incase will be able to use the software to not only design the new products, but rapidly test and adjust them with many more iterations than current methods of development allow.

“We are unlocking a new era in design and manufacturing, enabling designers and engineers to create previously impossible products and open up entirely new business models,” said Phil DeSimone, Vice President of Business Development and Co-founder, Carbon. “We are very excited to partner with Incase, fundamentally changing how device protection is designed, engineered, made, and delivered. The age of digital 3D Manufacturing is here, and we believe this will profoundly disrupt traditional manufacturing methods used to develop device protection today.”

The multi-year partnership gives Incase access to 20 M2 3D printers, as well as the exclusive right to co-brand Carbon-printed protective mobile solutions with the Carbon name.

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[Images: Incase]

 

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