Cazza Construction Technologies Introduces 3D Printing Construction Robots and Sees High Demand

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We first heard about California-based technology startup Cazza Construction Technologies last November, when it entered the scene with its ambitious goal of constructing 3D printed smart cities all around the world. The 3D printing construction technology company got off to a good start when it announced a collaboration with Dubai, and pledged to provide the city-state’s government with its construction automation technologies to help with 3D printed construction in the region, including a 3D printed skyscraper. Now, we’re finally getting a good look at the 3D printing construction technology of the future that the company has kept under wraps for over a year.

“Over the past year we’ve seen major progress working with the Dubai government as well as governments across the world. We are in the process of expanding to Africa, South America, and even Antarctica,” Chris Kelsey, the CEO and Co-Founder of Cazza, told 3DPrint.com. “Our machines were sold out two days after announcing them for sale.”

Meet Cazza’s robotic construction 3D printers – capable of building commercial buildings, houses, villas, and other unique structures. The robots combine large-scale 3D printing with traditional building methods, designed to make construction faster, along with more eco-friendly and cost-effective.

“The possibilities of 3D printing are still being explored and it’s an incredibly exciting time to be involved with this technology. We feel that architecture presents the greatest promise in terms of efficiency and capabilities,” Kelsey said. “We intend to revolutionize the construction industry through disruptive technology, making building safer, faster, more cost effective and environmentally-friendly.”

L-R: Chris Kelsey and Fernando De los Rios

Kelsey and Fernando De los Rios, Cazza COO and co-founder, formed the startup when they were 19 and 26 years old, respectively, to expand the possibilities that modern technology, like 3D printing, opened up for large-scale construction; similar to how steel, mass-produced glass panes, and reinforced concrete disrupted the field in the 19th century.

The company’s patented 3D printing construction robots, the X1 and the X1 Core, were launched this June, and represent the latest in automated building. The robotic platforms use concrete to print both large-scale and small-scale construction projects. Both robots feature safety sensor networks and continuous tracks, making it easy to maneuver and build structures onsite or indoors.

The X1 and the X1 Core both come with available upgrade packages that include a robot arm telescopic range extender, a hydraulic height extender support base, and a nozzle mounted smoothing mechanism; you can also upgrade the X1 Core with a field autopilot navigation. Every purchase comes with a two-year warranty, user manual, Cazza’s programming and control software, and full operator training courtesy of the experts at Cazza’s specialized building centers around the world.

“We wanted to ensure that Cazza’s 3D printing robots could be used around the world, not just limited to one country or territory,” explained De los Rios. “We believe that construction that provides increased value for money and has a positive impact on the environment, should be available to all.”

Other technical specs include:

  • Mobile tracked platform: 3.6 x 3.4 x 0.8 m for X1 and X1 Core
  • Rated payload of main robotic arm: 90 kg for X1, 550 kg for X1 Core
  • Robotic arm maximum frontal reach: 3.9 m for X1, 4.2 m for X1 Core
  • Protective covers: plastic-reinforced for X1, carbon fiber-reinforced for X1 Core

Rendering of Dubai 3D printed skyscraper by Aleksandar Grusanovic

Since Cazza introduced its robotic 3D printing construction platforms to the world this summer, the company has been “inundated” with requests and inquiries, which shows that there’s a lot of demand for automated construction technology in the world. We already know that the startup is working with Dubai – it worked on standardizing 3D printing regulations and processes for construction when it was accepted into the Dubai Future Accelerators (DFA) program – but it plans on continuing its global expansion.

“We will be opening offices in LA, Vancouver, and NYC within the next three months,” Kelsey told 3DPrint.com. “Within the next three years Cazza’s technologies will be the norm for mainstream construction in North America, Europe, and the Middle East just to start.”

Initially, only a limited quantity of Cazza’s X1 and X1 Core 3D printing construction robots will be available for purchase; you can visit the website for more details. To check out the company’s technology for yourself, you can watch the first demonstration video below:

 What do you think of Cazza’s 3D printing construction robots? Discuss this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com, or share your thoughts in the Facebook comments below.

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