Additive Manufacturing Strategies

Materialise and threeASFOUR Set Their Sights on Revolutionizing the Fashion Industry via 3D Printing

ST Medical Devices

Share this Article

dress bodice mainNew York City-based design firm threeASFOUR‘s avant garde fashion label has earned the company international accolades not only for its supremely creative designs but also for its willingness to exploit the potential of 3D printing to revolutionize the fashion industry. Recently, threeASFOUR won the Fashion Design Award from the Cooper-Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum, an honor that carries tremendous prestige. The award was given in response to the firm’s most recent contribution to the pantheon of notable harbingers of revolutionary haute couture–threeASFOUR’s Spring Summer 2016 dress. Or, rather, DRESS.

The company was originally called ASFOUR in the late ‘90s when it was founded. A decade-and-a-half later, with the departure of Kai Khune, who left to found his own label, Gabi Asfour, Angela Donhauser and Adi Gil form the core of the reconfigured but persistently cutting-edge and award-winning fashion label, threeASFOUR. Not only will you see designs by them on the runway but if you visit the Victoria and Albert Museum in London or the Metropolitan Museum of Art Costume Institute, you’ll find pieces by threeASFOUR in both world-class museums’ collections.

Designer Gabi Asfour of threeASFOUR, who is collaborating with 3D printing colossus Materialise, particularly in the area of 3D modeling, remarked on the potential for 3D printing to change the face of fashion, “3D printing is going to take the industry multiple steps ahead in terms of form and function.” She likens the radical transformation of the fashion industry by 3D printing to the emergence of Lycra in the 1980s. Indeed, the now-ubiquitous material changed the way clothing was made and the manner in which, Asfour explained, “garments behave.”

dress 2

The designers at threeASFOUR began collaborating with Materialise back in 2013 and subsequently launched their MER KA BA collection, which, according to an article by Materialise, fused “avant-garde couture, architecture, video projections and, of course, 3D printing.” The inspiration for the MER KA BA collection, which eventually comprised a five-month-long exhibition at New York City’s Jewish Museum, was “sacred geometry and tile patterns found in synagogues, churches and mosques around the world.” Motifs as old as the three major world religions themselves combined with design aesthetics of modern day to emphasize threeASFOUR’s “hybrid identity and utopian vision.” The three designers who hail from Israel, Lebanon, and Tajikistan were joined by Materialise and architect Bradley Rothenberg who assisted them in developing 3D printed textiles “based on symbolic latticework.”

ThreeASFOUR’s Spring Summer 2016 dress promises to be yet another technological and artistic leap forward while at once celebrating the firm’s preceding decade of success and innovation. Described by the trio of designers as a “meta-retrospective collection,” their work for 2016 looks back at “familiar motifs” while pushing the envelope in terms of technological innovation.

“The challenge,” explains Materialise of threeASFOUR’s process, “was to use the 3D-printed surfaces as pattern pieces, just as if they were fabric being cut into pre-patterned sections of the dress. There’s a true marriage of traditional tailoring and modern 3D modeling.”

ThreeASFOUR’s stunning dress design neither screams “impractical” nor assures the wearer’s comfort. Rather, it belongs to realm of fashion that is far more about presaging the future than evoking the possibilities of pret a porter with such a design. Joined once again by Bradley Rothernberg, threeASFOUR and Materialise created a sensational example of how their ingenious “3D fabric weaves multiplied and the geometry got more intricate,” said Gabi.

The extraordinary dress reads as an extension of the body of the model, with sheer portions revealing the flesh beneath the complex weaves of 3D printed fabric while the projecting portions suggest delicate, elegant, lacy outcroppings on the landscape of the body. Historically, haute couture has never been about wearability as much as it has been about potential and with threeASFOUR’s latest design and, significantly, its collaborative efforts combining couture, architecture, and 3D modeling and printing, we’ve been provided with a scintillating glimpse of the future of fashion.

[Photos: Schohaja]

Share this Article


Recent News

3D Printing Webinar and Event Roundup: January 16, 2022

3D Printing News Briefs, January 15, 2022: 3D Laser Printing, Housing, & More



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

Featured

Max the Macaw is Back in Business with 3D Printed Titanium Beak

Birds use their beaks for a number of reasons, from grooming and eating to climbing and fighting. Max, a handsome 20-year-old macaw now living in the Hyacinth Haven Bird Sanctuary...

3D Printed Vaginal Rings Could Treat Bacterial Infections

There are plenty of examples in which 3D printing has been used to develop drug delivery systems, but this research out of Hungary is tackling the issue from a new...

3D Printing News Briefs, January 12, 2022: Rebranding, Bioprinting, & More

First up in today’s 3D Printing News Briefs, Particle3D has gone through a rebrand, and a team of researchers developed a way to 3D print and preserve tissues in below-freezing...

“California-based Rocket Company” Orders Two of SLM’s 12-Laser Metal 3D Printers

When the equipment you make costs millions of dollars, every sale is newsworthy. When that equipment is meant to revolutionize metal 3D printing and, therefore, manufacturing as a whole, it...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.