Kideville Introduces Children to 3D Design Through Game Play

Share this Article

There are a lot of ideas about what interests kids…and as many ideas about whether or not those interests are healthy for them. Each generation seems certain that whatever the latest development is in technology, it is bound to destroy their children’s minds. I can imagine parents sitting around concerned that their child’s easy access to paper was going to cause them to spend all day staring at it and never go outside and play with their friends, like they used to do when they were children.

icimagesIn order to prepare children to interact with the world as it is and as it is going to be, it is vital that these kids understand and be comfortable with technologies such as those available for 3D design and 3D printing. They already have a long school day, piano lessons, soccer practice, dance class, and scouts…so how do you convince them to give up some of their play time to devote to the study of 3D tech? By making it a game, of course.

Kideville is just that: a game that feels like playtime while still teaching valuable skills. And what’s even better is that has been designed to align with national curriculum goals meaning that maybe, just maybe, rather than having to sacrifice their free playtime to learning, they can simply incorporate more playtime into their schedule.

kidevilleThis is the idea that was the driving force behind the creation of the educational startup Kidesign. The team at Kidesign, eight kids at heart, started the company in 2010 as a way of offering 3D print workshops to children wherever they were needed. After five years of offering these learning opportunities, they had interacted with thousands of children and had developed an in depth understanding of what was needed to develop a program for schools.

IMG_2803Operating on some of the same principles that have made city building electronic games so popular, Kideville was designed to encourage children to imagine themselves in the role of a design engineer and apply project management skills to the creation of the city’s structures. Where this game differs from its electronic counterparts is that rather than only existing as pixels on a screen, the miniature engineers in Kideville use 3D printing to bring their structures into the real world.

Dejan Mitrovice, Creative Director at Kidesign, explained the appeal and benefits of Kideville:IMG_2804 (1)

“Much like a game, each child is assigned a creative mission, based on their interests, which takes them through a full design and project management process that engineers would undertake in real life. These include background research, idea development, sketching out the plans, computer aided design modeling, 3D printing and presenting their project plan in class.”

I can imagine that some people will be dissatisfied with the idea that education incorporates games as a concession to the latest generation of technology. I wonder how many more children in past generations would have been successful in school if someone had taken the time to incorporate a little more fun into their learning.

Is this a good way to teach kids how to 3D Design?  Let’s hear your thoughts in the Kideville forum thread on 3DPB.com.

newseventsimages

Share this Article


Recent News

What is Metrology Part 21 – Getting Started with Processing

Analyzing & Solving 3D Printing Issues with Microfluidics



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

Multimaterial 3D Printing Filaments for Optoelectronics

Authors Gabriel Loke, Rodger Yuan, Michael Rein, Tural Khudiyev, Yash Jain, John Joannopoulous, and Yoel Fink have all come together to explore new filament options, with their findings outlined in...

Germany: Two-Photon Polymerization 3D Printing with a Microchip Laser

Laser additive manufacturing technology is growing more prevalent around the world for industrial uses, leading researchers to investigate further in relation to polymerization, with findings outlined in the recently published...

3D Printing Polymer-Bonded Magnets Rival Conventional Counterparts

Authors Alan Shen, Xiaoguang Peng, Callum P. Bailey, Sameh Dardona, and W.K Anson explore new techniques in ‘3Dprinting of polymer-bonded magnets from highly concentrated, plate-like particle suspension.’ While magnets have...

South Africa: FEA & Compression Testing of 3D Printed Models

Researchers D.W. Abbot, D.V.V. Kallon, C. Anghel, and P. Dube delve into complex analysis and testing in the ‘Finite Element Analysis of 3D Printed Model via Compression Tests.’ For this...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.


Print Services

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our 3DPrint.com.

You have Successfully Subscribed!