Man Creates an Air Hockey Robot Using Parts from a 3D Printer

Share this Article

airhockey3Building 3D printers has become a hobby for many tech hackers lately. With the price of these printers still hovering over $1000, the next best thing is to build your own and save a lot of money. One hacker by the name of Jose Julio decided to see what else he could build using the parts normally used to build a 3D printer. What he came up with was quite amazing.

“I have seen several interesting projects of robots that paint or manufacture PCBs, etc,” explained Julio on his blog. “I was looking for something different.”

His daughter is a big fan of air hockey, so he decided to use his love for robotics to construct an ‘Air Hockey Robot’. To get started Julio decided to use basic RepRap 3D printer parts such as the NEMA17 Stepper Motors, Arduino Mega microcontroller boards, RAMPS, belts, bearings, rods, and printed pieces.

airhockeyparts

“The main advantage of using these parts, is that they are cheap and easily available,” said Julio.

Not only was the robot portion of the Air Hockey Robot build entirely by Julio, but also the entire air hockey table – using old PC fans to create the stream of air.

airhockeyfansairhockey1

The robot has 2 motors running the Y-axis, and 1 running the X-axis. The software that runs the robot was created from scratch by Julio, after he determined that the Marlin software, which typically runs RepRap printers just wouldn’t get the job done. For the electronic eye that is located on air hockey paddle, Julio went with the PS3 EYE Cam, using OpenCV libraries for capturing, filtering, thresholding, and segmentation. The camera on the paddle detects a specifically colored puck, and sends it to the computer via serial port.

airhockeyy2

The computer systems detects the direction of where the puck is moving, using 2 consecutive frames from the camera, to determine the overall trajectory of the puck. The computer (as programmed by Julio) will then decide what type of move to make. Does it defend the goal, defend and attack, or just straight out attack?

airhockeytrajectory

So how good is this robot? Currently it could easily beat a child, but Julio said that an adult with some previous air hockey experience can still win. However, with a few small improvements to the code, he is sure that it could become extremely difficult to beat.

Julio has put the code, 3D designs and documentation up on GitHub. The detailed building instructions for the entire robot, including the table, can be found on Google Docs.

While the project seems very complicated, Julio is pretty insistent that it is not. He is not completely done with this project, as he still has a few additions that he would like to make.

“Currently the robot is not able to detect goals but we could improve this in future,” he explained. “In the future the robot can self-calibrating the camera using predefined movement at the beginning – to avoid the camera calibration.”

Julio is even considering building a dual robot table, where people put their robots up against someone else’s.

Discuss this robot, as well as the technical aspects that go into developing something like this at: http://3dprintboard.com/showthread.php?1685-Man-Creates-an-air-hockey-robot-using-3d-printer-parts

[source]

Share this Article


Recent News

How 3D Printing is Changing the Cosmetics Industry

3D Printing News Briefs: September 21, 2019



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

Momentus–Relativity Space Agreement Will Lead to Multiple Launches for First 3D Printed Rocket

Relativity Space, headquartered in Los Angeles, continues to forge ahead within the 3D printing and additive manufacturing realm—but even more so, within the aerospace industry. Now, they have announced a...

Titomic Signs Agreement & MoU with GE Additive Company AP&C for Titanium 3D Printing Powder

It hardly seems possible that it’s now been two years since Australian metal 3D printing company Titomic unveiled its patented, innovative Titomic Kinetic Fusion (TKF) process, which is adapted from...

CELLINK to Acquire German Startup cytena for 30 Million Euros

Bioprinting company CELLINK announced it has entered into an agreement with the owners of life science company cytena GmbH, of Germany, to acquire all of the company shares for a purchase...

3D Printing News Briefs: July 2nd, 2019

We’re talking partnerships and materials in today’s 3D Printing News Briefs. The Alfa Romeo F1 team and Additive Industries are strengthening their technology partnership, while Beam-IT and SLM Solutions are...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.


Print Services

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our 3DPrint.com.

You have Successfully Subscribed!