Floreon Unveils Innovative New PLA/Polyester Filament – 4 Times Stronger Than Typical PLA

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fl2When it comes down to it, PLA is typically the preferred material of the majority of desktop 3D printer enthusiasts. Environmentally friendly (at least when compared to ABS), affordable, versatile, and nontoxic, the material is perfect for many DIY projects. With that said, there are also disadvantages to using PLA as opposed to other filaments like ABS or nylon. For one it’s not the toughest material on the market. It can easily crack and is not very flexible, making it a poor choose for certain projects.

A new company based in Hull, UK, called Floreon, wants to change all of this. Described as an ‘innovative bioplastics company’ Floreon has officially announced the launch of their brand new bio-3D printing filament called Floreon3D. The new filament, a product of 4 years of research with the University of Sheffield, is a PLA/Polyester composite which the company claims is 4 times as tough as typical PLA filament.

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“We wanted to offer a high quality 3D printing filament that is far better than conventional PLA,” explained Dr Andrew Gill, Floreon Technical Director. “It has taken us five years but I’m pleased to say all the hard work has paid off and we have found the resulting product gives a smooth printing experience with excellent interlayer adhesion and is less likely to break than conventional PLA. In addition it is four times stronger and, with an excellent matt finish, the items it produces look very professional. All this is achieved without compromising the attractive aspects of PLA such as low odor and low print temperatures compared to other popular plastics used in 3D printing.”

The key features of this new composite filament include the following, according to the company:fl5

  • Flexible, extremely tough and stronger than typical PLA (Stiffness = 1.9GPa, Tolerance = 0.05mm)
  • Will not degrade when exposed to UV light like typical PLA
  • Exceptional matte finish of printed objects
  • Available in six vibrate colors (red, blue, yellow, green, white and black)
  • Biodegradable just like normal PLA
  • Neutral, unoffensive smell
  • Consistent diameter of 1.75mm
  • Stronger with fewer breaks once printed with
  • No nozzle clogging, less machine downtime and less waste

“We have begun to produce Floreon3D in commercial quantities and I am delighted to say that it is now available for end users to purchase on Amazon,” stated Bill Stringer, fl3Floreon Commercial Director. “Currently available in 1.75mm diameter in 6 colours – red, blue, yellow, black, white and of course green – we will be working to extend the range of products over the coming year.” However Floreon’s ambitions do not end there as Mr Stringer explained. “Now that we have moved into production, we are working to form partnerships with printer manufacturers, to make Floreon3D their recommended high performance, environmentally friendly 3D printing filament, and with distributors and filament producers to incorporate Floreon resin into their products.”

The company says the new material is perfect for a variety of applications which are not just limited to 3D printing. These applications include plant labels, food packaging, blow molding and more.

Let us know if you’d used this new materials either within your 3D printer or for other manufacturing methods. Discuss in the Floreon3D forum thread on 3DPB.com. Check out the video testimonial below from Alex Youden of NFIRE LABS.

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