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These 3D Printed Modular Clothing Embellishments Look Like They Came Straight Out of a Sci-Fi Movie

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d5We’ve already seen 3D printing play a major role in upcoming fashion design, and although we likely won’t see individuals strolling down the street fully clad in 3D printed gear any time soon, the technology is providing designers with yet another tool to excel. As the technology and materials behind 3D printing progress, there is little doubt in my mind that 3D printed jewelry, clothing, and accessories will eventually become the norm. And as designers slowly begin to transition from the exotic and unique, and start using the technology to create more traditional, everyday clothing, adoption of such designs will pick up among typical, everyday people like you and me.

Continuing to stray more toward the exotic and conceptual view of fashion, one Dublin, Ireland-based textile design student from the National College of Art and Design in Dublin, named Sarah O’Neill, recently put forth quite an interesting take on 3D printed clothing. In what could best be described as a ‘clothing add-on’, she utilizes 3D printing in a way that shoots us directly into a futuristic world, where instead of using two-dimensional images printed on clothing to express ourselves, we rely on all three dimensions.

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The concept, which she calls “3d Printed Modular Embellishments for Fashion,” was designed for her final project in one of her classes. Each piece, which consists of tiny looped balls with all sorts of little figures and doodads affixed to it, was intricately designed and 3D printed before being secured to the fabric using laser cut acrylic. This bypasses the need for stitching and glue and enables pieces to be swapped out if necessary, perhaps in order to change the style of the outfit altogether.d2

Model Hazel Farrell, from NotAnother Agency, wore the dress confidently as she was on hand to help O’Neill show it off to the world at the Sew Exhibition at the Temple Bar Gallery, in the heart of Dublin last month. As you can see from the images, the piece certainly looks like nothing we have come upon before. Farrell appears as if she came straight out of a futuristic sci-fi movie, with robotic spheres rolling all over her.

Like with many of the 3D printed fashion we have covered, you likely will not be wearing this yourself, or walking past an individual wearing this on the street anytime in the next 50-100 years.  However, the concept certainly does what it’s supposed to do, draw one’s attention to its originality. Let us know your thoughts on O’Neill’s 3D printed work of art. Discuss in the 3D Printed Modular Embellishments forum thread on 3DPB.com.

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