Kudo3D Offering Three New Unique SLA Resins and Autodesk Meshmixer Training

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Flexible Spot-E Elastic SLA Resin

Based in San Francisco, 3D printer manufacturer Kudo3D raised nearly $700,000 to produce their Titan 1 SLA 3D printers, and following the release of a selection of a castable resins near the end of last year, they’ve now announced three new resin offerings and a set of training materials to help designers get the most out of Autodesk Meshmixer.

The three new resins; Hard & Tough for high resolution in both grey and bronze colors from Spot A, Red Spot-E Elastic Resin for flexible prints and Spot-HT resin in grey, require no extra pigment and are capable of achieving resolution down to 37 microns on the X and Y axes.

"Froggy" model by Spectoys

“Froggy” model by Spectoys

Hard & Tough and Spot-HT are priced at $110 for the 1-kilogram bottle, and flexible Spot-E elastic resin – with it’s good surface smoothness, low viscosity and high cure speed – comes in red and is available for $120 for a 1-kilogram bottle.

Kudo3D is also running a Kickstarter campaign to help you improve your CAD modeling skills online, and that course is priced at just for $20. The campaign recently launched and it’s 91% funded. Starting at $20, a support commitment gets backers 20+ Hours of online video tutorials which help simplify the use of Autodesk Meshmixer.

The self-paced instructional series includes more than 140 videos organized by topic or tool, and Kudo3D says the series will “help users learn CAD the easy way on this powerful, yet fun tool that will allow you to work with ‘digital clay.’”

While the course is normally priced at $149, HoneyPoint3D is now offering it to early backers for just $20. And as part of the launch of these new resins and instruction materials, Kudo3D is also showing off some amazing biomedical tissue scaffold prints by Annalisa De Paolis, a PhD in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at The City College of New York.

The tissue scaffolds were printed in their 3DM Cast resin, and at 37 microns XY resolution and 20 microns Z resolution, they’re amazing demonstrations of what biomedical researchers and designers can do with the Titan 1 SLA 3D printer.

Kudo3D says that they’re also working with the UCSF and SFGH Orthopaedic Trauma Institute Biomechanical Testing Facility to explore ways which 3D printing can improve pre-surgerical planning methods.

Let us know your thoughts on these very inique new resins within the SLA space.  Will you be using the new resin choices from Kudo3D or backing their Kickstarter campaign for Autodesk Meshmixer training? Discuss in the Kudo3D forum thread on 3DPB.com.

biomedical_tissue_scaffold biomechanical

 

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