The World’s First 3D Printed NCAA College Tournament Bracket is Created for March Madness

Share this Article

bracketfeaturedIt’s that time of year again folks! March Madness is here, and basketball fans everywhere are rooting for their favorite teams, wagering on games, and watching as teams begin falling off of their brackets. I’m personally an Ohio State fan, and unfortunately for us, we lost to Arizona. My husband always roots for Gonzaga, and lucky for him, they have been cruising as of late. If you ask me, no one will be getting in the way of Kentucky this year, but then again, I’m also not the world’s largest basketball fan.

bracket2While filling out a bracket for the NCAA College Basketball Tournament seems simple enough, the odds of actually getting it all correct are nearly impossible. In fact, those odds are are around 1 in 9,223,372,036,854,775,808. If you were wondering, that staggeringly large number is 9.2 quintillion. Statistically speaking, if every single person on this planet were to fill out 100 brackets each, it would take 13 million years to have one that comes out perfect. So for those of you who had actually thought you were going to get it right this year, think again. The odds are you were probably out after the first round.

Still though, it is always fun competing against friends and colleagues to see who can fill out the most accurate bracket. For one company, called Realize, Inc., they decided to do something a bit different this year. Being that they are a company specializing in rapid prototyping and 3D printing, they set out to create what they believe is the first ever 3D printed NCAA Tournament bracket.

bracket1

“We are building something new each month using 3D Printing technology and for March we decided to create the World’s First (that we know of) 3D Printed College Hoops Tournament Bracket,” explained a representative from Realize, Inc.

Realize, Inc. plans to update their bracket as more and more teams drop out of the tournament, and you can follow the progress live on their blog. Without a doubt, this is quite the unique creation, albeit a very simplistic one, but then again some of the most simple 3D printed objects are the ones which really catch on within the 3D printing community.

What do you think about this unique creation from Realize, Inc.? More importantly, how are you doing on this year’s bracket? Who will win it all? Discuss in the World’s First 3D Printed Bracket forum thread on 3DPB.com.

Share this Article


Recent News

Mimaki Integrates Fraunhofer’s Cuttlefish 3D Printer Driver into 3DUJ-553 Systems

Operation Namaste Making 3D Printed Molds for Prosthetic Aligners in Nepal



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

Jumbo 3D Manufacturing Partners with MOBILIS Medical for 3D Printing in Healthcare

Last year, diversified business Jumbo Group, which is the UAE’s leading distributor of IT and consumer electronics, launched a new business dedicated to 3D printing called Jumbo 3D Manufacturing. Now,...

Interview with RESA’s Glen Hinshaw on 3D Printing Shoes

Glen Hinshaw’s path to 3D printing is more circuitous than most. He used to ride in professional cycling circuits, was on the US Postal cycling team, founded a circuit board...

Thermwood & Purdue: 3D Printed Composite Molds to Make Compression Molding Parts

If I had to name one company that’s an expert in terms of machining, I’d say Indiana-based Thermwood Corporation, the oldest CNC machine manufacturing company in business. The company has...

TU Delft: A New Approach for the 3D Printed Hand Prosthetic

In the recently published ‘Functional evaluation of a non-assembly 3D-printed hand prosthesis,’ authors (from TU Delft) Juan Sebastian Cuellar, Gerwin Smit, Paul Breedveld, Amir Abbas Zadpoor, and Dick Plettenburg outline...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.


Services & Data

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our 3DPrint.com.

You have Successfully Subscribed!