BigRep Offers New Leasing Service for STUDIO G2 Large Format 3D Printer

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Berlin-based serial production, large-format FFF 3D printing solutions provider BigRep first introduced the latest addition to its STUDIO range, the BigRep STUDIO G2, at RAPID 2019. Created for industrial applications and featuring dual extruders with two 0.6 mm ruby nozzles, a fast-heating print bed, proprietary BigRep BLADE slicer software, heated filament cabinet, and a 500 x 1000 x 500 mm enclosed build envelope, the BigRep STUDIO G2 is, as BigRep America’s CBO and President Frank Marangell told me at the trade show, “what the STUDIO wants to be when it grows up.” Now, the company is beginning a turnkey leasing service for the STUDIO G2, so that customers across North America can rent the versatile system and achieve affordable and flexible additive manufacturing solutions.

With this new offering, customers can rent the versatile BigRep STUDIO G2 3D printing system in six-month leases at a pretty affordable and competitive rate of (net) $3,000 a month. This cost does not include training, installation, and various other service features, but by paying a small nominal fee, you can receive these as well.

“For the first time, our service makes a large-format industrial 3D printer available to new customers or small- to mid-sized businesses looking for a hassle-free and flexible turnkey AM solution at an affordable rate. Facing a challenging economic environment and volatile markets, customers today want quick and flexible solutions without big investments or long-term obligations,” Marangell said in a press release. “By making 3D printing available today, BigRep is helping companies stay ahead of the curve with an agile manufacturing solution to be even more competitive tomorrow.”

With this standard lease, rental customers will also be able to access all of BigRep’s high-performance filaments (including ABS, BVOH, PET-CF, and more), 3D printing knowledge, its global partner network, and industrial applications. This new leasing service of the STUDIO G2 is just adding on to the company’s continually growing product offerings in North America, such as its Boston-based BigRep 3D PARTLAB, which supports customers and partners who are over capacity, and other companies that require large-format parts printed to specifications, by providing on-demand 3D printing services for end-use parts, prototypes, tooling, and molds. PARTLAB offers users its full range of engineering-grade materials, and provides the company’s industrial customer base in North America with comprehensive large-scale 3D printing services.

According to BigRep, its durable STUDIO G2 makes it easy for users to manufacture large-format parts with high quality. While it offers a generous build volume, the printer doesn’t look bulky or oversized, which makes it a good fit for a variety of workspaces, such as factory floors and office spaces. It has a fully enclosed build envelope, with a controlled environment that makes it possible to keep conditions optimal for use with advanced materials, like ASA and abrasive carbon fiber-reinforced plastic, which can be turned into complex parts with the help of high-flow extruders. BigRep’s BLADE slicer software is also installed on the STUDIO G2, to help ensure material use calculations and accurate print time.

BigRep is offering this newly introduced service together with its partner NCP Leasing, which offers capitalization of other high technology capital equipment and is focused on lease financing of AM systems. If, once a customer’s six-month lease has expired, they’re not quite ready to part with the STUDIO G2, there are a few different options, such as renewing the lease or purchasing the 3D printer at a competitive price.

This isn’t the first 3D printer leasing/rental program we’ve heard about: in addition to Airwolf 3D, Becoming 3D, Verashape, and NVBots, a sharing economy online app for 3D printing called Threedigo was launched in 2016, and HP, Carbon, and Desktop Metal have all offered some form of 3D as a service, which allows customers to pay for its 3D printing services on a usage or subscription basis. I personally think it’s a good idea, as it could be a way to ease unsure companies into adopting 3D printing.

(Source/Images: BigRep)

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