Metal Binder Jetting
Automotive Polymers

Additive Manufacturing Software Represents $3.7 Billion Opportunity in 2027

Share this Article

SmarTech Analysis has put out its most recent report, “Opportunities in Additive Manufacturing Software Markets 2020”, which relays some surprising data about the segment.  The market research firm anticipates pretty rapid growth for the additive manufacturing (AM) software sector, with revenues increasing from $460 million in 2020 to an impressive $3.7 billion by 2027.

In this, the first study of the AM software segment since SmarTech’s pioneer report in 2017, analyst Scott Dunham examines the current state and future of AM software functions, including process simulation, intelligent design optimization AM execution systems. A broad conclusion from the report is the fact that 3D printing software is becoming less of a niche part of AM and industrial manufacturing as a whole and becoming more significant and robust overall.

ANSYS software compensating for distortions in metal laser powder bed fusion 3D printing. (Image courtesy of ANSYS.)

AM software has obviously become more advanced, with significant progress being made in terms of metal and polymer AM simulation, as well as quality control technology. With the ANSYS acquisition of 3DSIM, Hexagon developing its own metal AM simulation software, and Velo3D selling its Assure software, we know that software is now crucial to repeatability and first-time-right parts in 3D printing.

At the same time, it is becoming increasingly integrated into leading CAD/CAM and PLM software. Siemens, for instance, began incorporating AM capabilities into its design tools via Materialise and Frustum products in 2017, while Dassault has continually added 3D printing functions to SOLIDWORKS. The fact that Autodesk acquired Netfabb and is attempting to link all of its CAD and manufacturing tools into a single ecosystem is further evidence of this trend. The report suggests that, in the course of the past three years, AM software is improving manufacturing outcomes for users by providing better connectivity and cohesion from design through to production.

Scan to CAD in SOLIDWORKS.

In particular, print preparation software is being incorporated into other areas of the AM software chain so that functions such as slicing, STL repair, support structure and orientation strategy will fit into other software points in the design-to-production workflow. According to SmarTech, while major AM software tools like Materialise Magics, Autodesk Netfabb and 3D Systems 3DXpert will continue to widespread use, there will be pressure to lower costs that will see users perform the functions they achieve with these programs in other more condensed software platforms.

Source: SmarTech Analysis.

All of SmarTech’s latest reports also take the COVID-19 pandemic into account, recognizing that, on the one hand, AM has played and will play an increased role in establishing new supply chains. In the case of AM software, the company sees software used  “as never before” as this new supply chain is further developed. Dunham suggests that AM software will bring order to manufacturing, while diversifying supply chains and providing a backstop against disruptions for firms who rely on Asia for manufacturing.

The report is made up of a detailed study of market sizing with ten-year market forecasts that segments the industry into software tool type, adopting end-user industry, and opportunities for AM software per 3D printing technology segment, including polymers and metals. SmarTech suggests that its AM software reports are now used throughout the AM industry by companies pursuing an off-the-shelf resource for extensive market data and forecasts. Companies discussed in the report include Autodesk, 3D Systems, Materialise, Siemens, AMFG and Dassault Systèmes.

The full report, as well as a summary and table of contents, can be found at the SmarTech Analysis website here.

Share this Article


Recent News

3D Printing News Unpeeled, Live with Joris Peels – Tuesday 9th of August

UCLA Materials Scientists Awarded Grant for 3D Printed Batteries



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

Featured

3D Systems Buys High-Speed 3D Printing Firm dp polar

The 3D printing mergers and acquisitions continue apace. On the heels of Markforged’s buyout of Digital Metal and Nano Dimension’s 12 percent purchase of Stratasys, 3D Systems (NYSE: DDD) has...

New Player in Space: X-Bow’s Test Rocket Reaches Orbit with 3D Printed Motors

Just four months after coming out of stealth mode, space technology company X-Bow Launch Systems successfully launched its first rocket in a test carried out in partnership with the Department...

Sakuu Opens Battery 3D Printing Facility in Silicon Valley

Silicon Valley startup Sakuu is using some of the funds from its total $62 million raised to open a new facility for its battery 3D printing platform. The multi-million-dollar site...

US DoE Awards $3M to Fortify and polySpectra for 3D Printed Tooling

The US Department of Energy (DOE) announced 30 projects that have been selected to receive a total of $57.9 million in grants from the Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO). Among the...