Additive Manufacturing Strategies

Introducing the World’s Largest 3D Printed Marvin! It’s Marvelous!

ST Medical Devices

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marvin-big-featuredThere are those symbols within the 3D printing space that have become, quote on quote, “mascots” for a growing technology. Whether it is the Formlabs “Rook“, the ever so popular “Yoda” or the 3DHubs “Marvin”, they all represent something.

Most of these symbols came about as a means to compare 3D printers’ capabilities with one another. One object which can be printed on various machines can go a long way in showing that one machine is capable of printing with higher resolution, faster speeds, and less noticeable layers, when compared to another. Probably the symbol that has been the most popular as of late would be that of 3DHubs, and their miniature “Marvin” figurine. Marvin is a robot that doubles as a keychain ornament. He has become a symbol, not only of 3DHubs itself, but of 3D printing technology in general.

marvin-big-miniJust two months ago, we ran a story on an incredibly small 3D printed Marvin, which measured only 2.4mm in diameter. It was created by a hub in Budapest, called Basiliskus3D. They used a Solidscape T76 Plus 3D printer to create this extremely small robot, and it went down in the record book (at least our record books) as the world’s smallest known Marvin.

If this were the smallest Marvin ever printed, then undoubtedly there has to be a version of the largest Marvin somewhere on the internet. We think we may have found it!

The 3DHub for Marco of i3D, has created a gigantic 3D printed Marvin, and it is like nothing we have seen before. Printed on a soon-to-be-released PivotMaker 3D printer, this Marvin measures a whopping 800x600x800mm (31.4 x 23.6 x 31.4 inches) in size and took an incredible 180 continuous hours of print time to complete at a print speed of 50mm/s.

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This marvelous Marvin was printed using a layer height of 0.5mm, using a nozzle with a diameter of 1mm. It used a staggering 13.8kg of filament, and featured an infill of 3%. As you can see in the photos and video, the print came out very nicely for having such a large size.  Now the only question is, who will be the next to create a Marvin even larger than this one?  It will surely be done sometime soon.

What do you think about this gigantic version of Marvin? Discuss in the HUGE Marvin forum thread on 3DPB.com. Check out some more photos below (provided by i3D).

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