3D Printing News Briefs: January 11, 2020

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We’ve got some business news to share with you in today’s 3D Printing News Briefs. For starters, Knust-Godwin has purchased a Sapphire 3D printer from VELO3D. The AMable project has issued another Open Call for 3D printing projects, and ASTM International launched an Additive Manufacturing Personnel Certificate Program. Finally, ABĒMIS LLC has announced new hyper-structure technologies for 3D printing.

Knust-Godwin Purchases Sapphire 3D Printer for Oil and Gas Industry

Precision-tool and components manufacturer Knust-Godwin has just purchased its first Sapphire metal 3D printer from VELO3D, which it will use to manufacture high-quality, SupportFree parts for the oil and gas industry, as well as aerospace applications, both of which require complex geometries, rapid delivery, and intense thermal management of extreme temperatures. The Sapphire, which comes with Flow advanced pre-print software and Assure quality management software, will be delivered to Knust-Godwin in the first quarter of 2020.

“We see so many parts that have been manufactured with traditional methods that could take advantage of the benefits from AM,” said Michael Corliss, the VP of Technology for Knust-Godwin. “Our new Sapphire system provides the accuracy and low-print-angle capabilities that enable recreation of those parts via AM without having to go through a complicated redesign process. We can finally print parts as-is, offering valuable cost-savings to our customers and improved turnaround time for delivery.”

AMable Project Launching Third Open Project Call

The AMable project, which works to provide funding opportunities at the EU level in order to develop AM projects from concept to complete product, recently launched a fourth Open Project Call (OC4). This call offers SMEs and small- to medium-sized enterprises the chance to submit a proposal in order to receive financial support, at their own companies, for innovative 3D printing ideas.

The submission deadline for OC4, which has an estimated budget of €450, is March 1st, 2020; available experimentation Types are Feasibility Studies and Best Practice Experiments. For more information, including templates, FAQ, and the rules, please visit the OC4 website.

ASTM International Announces Upcoming AM Certificate Program

The ASTM International Additive Manufacturing Center of Excellence (AM CoE) is launching one of the additive manufacturing industry’s first personnel certificate programs, which will cover all the basic concepts of the AM process chain and provide core technical knowledge, including standardized methodologies, that’s related to best practices. The comprehensive course, which will include specific modules such as design and simulation, feedstock, mechanical testing, post-processing, and safety, was developed after ASTM International completed a landscape analysis in order to determine where the gaps were located in current AM education and workforce development.

“With more and more industry sectors adopting additive manufacturing technologies, there is a growing demand for an educated workforce to support the expanding field. This is a groundbreaking first step in meeting that need,” said Dr. Nima Shamsaei, director of the National Center for Additive Manufacturing Excellence (NCAME) at Auburn University in Alabama, where the course will be held. “To fill the AM knowledge gap, we need world-class training from industry leaders who can equip the future workforce with highly valued technical knowledge.”

The course, held March 10-12, will be taught by academia, industry, and regulatory agency experts, and will require attendees to pass an exam in order to earn the “Basic AM Certificate” that is a prerequisite for specialized, role-based AM certificates that the AM CoE holds.

ABĒMIS Introduces Hyper-structure Technologies for 3D Printing

Cleveland, Ohio-based company ABĒMIS LLC has introduced new HGon technologies, which were developed in-house at ABĒMIS Research Labs and included advanced field-adaptive optimizing hyper-structures for the generative design and 3D printing of ultra-lightweight, vibration-controlling, high strength-to-weight ratio components. HGons just look like lattices when you first look at them, but they actually use controlled complex (directed) structures to push the concept of a lattice to multiple dimensions and “local-global isotropy.”

ABĒMIS can convert nearly any STL or CAD component into a shape-accurate, 3D printable HGon manifold structure, which can reduce a part’s weight by 50-80%. The image to the left shows several examples that the company has completed for current clients, such as Sandia National Labs, Marquette University, and ADDiTEC Inc. ABĒMIS is now offering free initial consultations and sample parts (contact [email protected]), and is also requesting investor inquiries for a limited time. To learn more, download the company’s whitepaper, or check out the video below:

Discuss these stories and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts in the Facebook comments below.

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