TIGER & Impossible Objects: Creating Thermoset-Based Composites

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Based in Wels, Austria, TIGER has offices around the world, to include North America, Europe, and Asia. Originally founded as a paint shop in the 1930s, the TIGER business has grown and changed impressively over the years, now with eight production facilities and sales networks in almost 50 countries. Today, they specialize in materials such as powder coatings and inks, and the company has plans to collaborate with Impossible Objects for further development of materials for thermoset-based 3D printing.

As the two companies work together to expand additive manufacturing processes for their client base, their mission is to offer greater strength in critical applications for clients engaged in the production of components that must be fail-proof for industries like aerospace or automotive.

The development team at TIGER sought out a partnership with the Northbrook, Illinois-based Impossible Objects due to their considerable expertise in developing composites; in fact, the US manufacturer of 3D printers and materials relies on a composite-based additive manufacturing process (CBAM) for production of materials that are high-performing and lightweight, as explained on their website:

“It produces parts stronger than other additive manufacturing technologies, faster than traditional composite methods, with more design freedom, and a broader selection of materials, including carbon fiber and fiberglass paired with Nylon and PEEK.”

CBAM also offers users the ability to manufacture parts with stronger, more consistent mechanical properties—in comparison to regular polymer-based 3D printing.

These parts offer better temperature performance, durability, and can be made ten times faster than other manufacturing processes. Their progress has been dynamic throughout the years, from announcing their initial pilot project to the rewards of significant investment rounds worth millions, to the continued evolution of materials development for industrial 3D printing users.

And as the TIGER team explains in their recent press release sent to 3DPrint.com, thermoset materials have some advantages:

  • Ability to remain in a permanent, solid-state
  • Outstanding isotropic performance
  • Dimensional stability
  • Low density
  • Adjustable flame-retardant behavior

Both companies involved in this recent collaboration expect that the development of a new 3D printing thermoset-based composite will play a major role in helping industrial users meet their goals in the future for production.

The CBAM-2 by Impossible Objects. (Image: Impossible Objects)

TIGER will continue to fall back on its background in the processing of thermoset materials, along with the production of high-quality coatings used on car parts, furniture, construction equipment, and other agricultural and industrial machines used by their clients. Finishing solutions from TIGER provide greater functionality to parts with better prints, improved protection, added texture and effect, and of course, better aesthetics via gloss and color.

What do you think of this news? Let us know your thoughts! Join the discussion of this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com.

[Source: TIGER/Impossible Objects press release]

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