Sinterit Scales Up with the New Lisa 2 3D Printer

Share this Article

The Lisa (L) and Lisa 2 SLS 3D printers

A few years ago, Sinterit introduced the Lisa, a desktop SLS 3D printer that promised to make selective laser sintering 3D printing technology accessible to anyone. The Lisa lived up to that promise, and has since become a household name in the 3D printing industry, particularly in the SLS area. The 3D printer is a compact, easy-to-use machine priced affordably for the technology, and now Sinterit is expanding its range with the Lisa 2 – a bigger and more powerful version of the Lisa that allows for larger parts and more materials.

In 2014, Sinterit was the first company to introduce its desktop-size SLS printer, the most affordable SLS printer of its time,” said Konrad Głowacki, Co-Founder of Sinterit. “It sparked a completely new desktop SLS segment, where this technology is finally available to the full range of industries and gives unlimited creative possibilities for designers and engineers. For the last 3 years we have used 3 tones of powder, printed 20000 prints and now with this experience  our SLS expert team is going one step further – we are launching the second, even more powerful machine.”

The Lisa 2 can produce 3D prints of up to almost 32 cm in one piece. Like its predecessor, it employs SLS technology, which can create detailed, precise parts without need for supports. It also features a nitrogen chamber that allows for many more materials than the original Lisa.

“I have been using Sinterit Lisa 1 for 1 year already as it was the best choice for me to fulfill all requirements: possibility to print complex structures, price, speed, reliability. Now I can’t wait to have delivered Lisa 2 which will give me the possibility to experiment with materials and print bigger pieces,” Professor Dr.-Ing. Rigo Herold told 3DPrint.com.

“Customers are happy with our powders, but they are still asking for new ones,” said Sinterit Co-Founder Michał Grzymala-Moszczynski. “That is why we decided to give them an option to experiment. With a nitrogen chamber, we can create a special environment inside the printer and expand the list of potential materials.”

3D printing materials for the Lisa 2 include strong, chemical-resistant plastics Nylon PA12 and Flexa Black, a TPU material for rubberlike applications, as well as the new Flexa Gray, which has better flexibility, and PA11, which has superior chemical and mechanical resistance. The R&D department is continuing to work on additional materials, plus customers are free to experiment with different materials on their own.

The wide variety of materials that the Lisa 2 can print with means that customers can use it for a wide variety of applications, both prototyping and functional parts in industries such as automotive, electronics, robotics, plastics, medicine and more. Nylon PA12 is the most popular material, with which customers can 3D print things like turbines, pipes and electronic housings, while with Nylon PA11 they print items such as tool handles and hand rails. More flexible materials lend themselves to things like seals and flexible easels.

Along with the new Lisa 2, Sinterit is also releasing its Sinterit Studio 2018 software, which offers more automation and a better overall user experience.

“Now with such affordable and simple machines, you can move from other limiting 3D technologies and reach for powerful prints from SLS, simply on your desktop,” said Paweł Szczurek, Sinterit CEO.

The Sinterit Lisa 2 is priced at $14,900 for the 3D printer itself, and for the whole end-to-end system, which includes the Sinterit Sandblaster and Sieve, the cost is $17,400. Deliveries are set to begin in September, and pre-orders can be made from Sinterit’s website now.

Discuss this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts below.

[Images/Video provided by Sinterit]

 

Share this Article


Recent News

3D Printing Webinar and Virtual Event Roundup, August 9, 2020

3D Printing in India: Slow Adoption & What the Future Holds



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D printed automobiles

3D Printed Food


You May Also Like

3DP AIPerfecter Offers Part Analysis to 3D Printing Service Bureaus

Service bureaus offer the ability to have prototypes and parts fabricated on professional equipment (especially important as some designers may not have access to any 3D printing resources) and in...

Sponsored

Objectify and 3DPrint.com Partner to Launch Advanced Additive Manufacturing Webinar Series

Under the Objectify AddMics (derived: Additive Academics) initiative—from India’s largest additive manufacturing bureau—Objectify Technologies joins hand with one of the most followed 3D printing media houses in the world, 3DPrint.com,...

3D Printing News Briefs, June 24, 2020: Intech Additive, Titomic, PrintLab, LEHVOSS Group

We’re talking about business, education, and materials in today’s 3D Printing News Briefs. Intech Additive Solutions is introducing a new executive, while Titomic says goodbye to its chairman and hello...

3D Printed Food: Extruding Nutritious, Fiber-Rich Snacks from Composite Flour

Researchers from the Computational Modeling and Nanoscale Processing Unit, Indian Institute of Food Processing Technology (IIFPT), Ministry of Food Processing Industries, Govt. of India, Thanjavur, Tamil Nadu, India, have released...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.