Two Dutch Material Companies Release Unique New 3D Printing Filaments

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Dutch 3D printing materials manufacturer Formfutura is well known for its many unique materials, which run the gamut from wood and cork to stone and carbon fiber. The company has recently announced the launch of its new filament initiative, the high-performance Centaur PP.

The lightweight polypropylene (PP) filament, with a material density of 0.9 g/cc, was engineered to have excellent interlayer adhesion and mechanical properties.

The material has a high chemical resistance and great elastic properties, with a shore hardness of D50 and improved resistance to abrasion, fatigue, and wear.

Centaur PP is also certified food contact compliant with both the European Union and the FDA in the US. This feature, coupled with being both microwave and dishwasher safe, make it a multi-functional, very diverse material for multiple applications for consumers. But, it’s also strong enough to 3D print functional engineering objects with outstanding endurance properties.

Watertight 3D printing with Centaur PP is only possible with single wall prints, but can be stretched up to >600% before it breaks. Large prints made with the material can be printed on an unheated 2mm or 3mm PP plate, which can then be attached to the print bed, while smaller prints are fine to be completed on standard PP packaging tape.

General 3D printing guidelines when using Formfutura’s new Centaur PP material include:

  • Nozzle size: ≥ 0.4mm
  • Print temp: ± 220 – 240° C
  • Heat bed: ± 0 – 100° C *
  • Layer height: ≥ 0.1mm
  • Print speed: Medium / High
  • Fan speed: 50-100%
  • Flow rate: ± 104%
  • Retraction: Yes ± 5mm
  • Experience level: Intermediate

Available spool diameters are 1.75 mm and 1.85 mm, while the spool weight is 500 grams; however, a sample coil is 50 grams. One spool of natural Centaur PP filament will cost you €28.47 or €34.45, including tax, depending on the diameter.

Formfutura is also a distributor for a new sculptable filament from Thibra3D, also located in the Netherlands, called Thibra3D Skulpt.

Sculptable filaments are really unique – they handle like clay when warm, finish like wax, and when cooled are as hard as plastic. The material is very malleable when heated, so prints can be easily modified once they’re removed from the bed. Thibra3D refers to its new Skulpt material as “the first filament that can be post processed.”

According to a company release, “Thibra3D Skulpt is a temperature sensitive material that behaves like sculpting clay, allowing the user to make all kind of adjustments or changes on prints, after the 3D printing process! Printing lines, blobs or zits in the surface of your 3D print can easily be fixed, repaired, smoothened or adjusted. It is infinitely changeable by adding temperature with the use of an alcohol lamp, a heat gun or warm water. After adding heat, any adjustment can be made or any unevenness smoothed with the use of a tool and a wet finger.”

This “revolutionary filament” is perfect for all kinds of makers – from artists and architects to industrial designers and prop and model makers – who want the ability to create clean, smooth 3D printed parts quickly and at less cost.

Thibra3D Skulpt is available in multiple colors to provide forms and shadows with some clarity, and the filament is easy to paint over once a print is complete – just degrease the print in lukewarm water with soap, then rinse and dry. It’s easy to get rid of mistakes and print lines by smoothing the print with heat and water, so you can adjust, cut, carve, or add material to your heart’s content.

Prints made with Thibra3D Skulpt have a hard surface, so you can polish them, and the material is excellent for making fine details; it also never cracks or dries out, so it’s also reusable. The material is temperature sensitive – 70°C is the ideal for successful modeling. In addition, Thibra3D Skulpt is light but strong, and self-supporting enough that you don’t need an armature to sculpt.

In addition to Formfutura, the second distributor for Thibra3D Skulpt material is 3D Jake. Additional Thibra3D material products include thermoplastic sheet materials Thibra and Tex and a sculptable granulate called Thibra Pearl.

What do you think of these new filaments? Discuss 3D printing materials, and other 3D printing topics, at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts below. 

[Images provided by Formfutura and Thibra3D]

 

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