trinckle 3D’s Free Error Detection Service: No More Misprints!

Share this Article

trinckle_logo_250x75While there’s loads of nice, empowering talk out there today urging us all not to be afraid to fail, to learn from our mistakes, trinckle 3D isn’t even about to let you go there.

How to avoid common errors with 3D designs before they go to the 3D printer is a big question these days, as the technology has become so popular. What’s not so popular with users though is the dreaded, irritating misprint.

More than half of 3D printed designs end in misprints, which are annoying to experience, as well as causing added expense and effort in going back to the drawing (or designing) board. So, can’t you just double-check everything before it goes to print? Indeed, you can spend extra time looking over your model, or pay someone else to do it. trinkcle 3D is aware of the trials and tribulations involved with misprints, and endeavors to help 3D printing enthusiasts reduce extra output of time and money with a free, automated 3D repair service.

Avoid misprints!

Avoid misprints!

The Germany-based company has just announced this new service which fixes all the frequent and pesky errors plaguing users. Not just for advanced users, trinkcle 3D wanted to make sure their new service would be user-friendly to novices as well.

Founded by the Free University of Berlin in January 2013, trinkcle 3D has the online 3D printing market covered in Germany. They offer a 3D printing service, marketplace, and community to artists, designers, and makers. Now, they are going to solidify their place as leaders in 3D printing with a new service that guarantees no more 3D misprints, with their free repair service for their online 3D printing clientele. Common errors are usually caused by designs that need to be refined or are due to ‘insufficient export functions of common design software.’

This new service by trinckle 3D detects errors by finding them via algorithms in CAD files. Once detected, the errors are corrected automatically. trinkcle 3D points out that ‘only very rare errors need to be detected and corrected afterwards with thprintere naked eye.’

The service supports .stl, .3ds, and .ply formats currently. The free service is browser-based and available without registration. While it’s always helpful to get your design right initially, misprints can really complicate the whole process and take the fun out of learning a new technology as well. trinkcle 3D gives users the luxury of knowing what’s going on before the misprint gets fired off.

Is this a service you would find helpful? Do you find misprints to be an issue? Tell us about it in the trinkcle 3D forum at 3DPB.com.

 

Trinckle

The trinckle 3D Team: Marlene, Gunnar and Florian

Share this Article


Recent News

Cartilage Tissue Engineering via Characterization and Application of Carboxymethyl Chitosan-Based Bioink

University of Sheffield: Comparative Research of SLM & EBM Additive Manufacturing with Tungsten



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

Barcelona: Electrostatic Jet Deflection for Ultrafast 3D Printing

Barcelona researchers Ievgenii Liashenko, Joan Rosell-Llompart, and Andreu Cabot have come together to author the recently published, ‘Ultrafast 3D printing with submicrometer features using electrostatic jet deflection.’ Following the continued...

Cornet: Research Network in Lower Austria Explores Expanding 3D Printing Applications

Ecoplus Plastics and Mechatronics Cluster in Lower Austria has just completed their ‘AM 4 Industry’ Cornet project, outlining their findings regarding 3D printing—with the recently published work serving as the...

Additive Manufacturing: Still a Real Need for Design Guidelines in Electron Beam Melting

Researchers from King Saud University in Saudi Arabia explore the potential—and the challenges—for industrial users engaged in metal 3D printing via EBM processes. Their findings are outlined in the recently...

Metal 3D Printing Research: Using the Discrete Element Method to Study Powder Spreading

In the recently published ‘A DEM study of powder spreading in additive layer manufacturing,’ authors Yahia M. Fouda and Andrew E. Bayly performed discrete element method simulations to study additive manufacturing applications using titanium alloy (Ti6AlV4)...


Shop

View our broad assortment of in house and third party products.


Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our 3DPrint.com.

You have Successfully Subscribed!