DUS Architects Constructs 3D Printed “Urban Cabin” in Amsterdam

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All around the world, from China to Slovenia, an increasing number of architecture firms, construction companies, and even ambitious makers are turning to 3D printing technology as a tool to build innovative and affordable infrastructure. What once began as more of a conceptual idea is now starting to come to full fruition. We’ve already seen the opening of a fully 3D printed office building in Dubai, while one engineer, Baylor University’s Alex Le Roux, has taken it upon himself to design and build his own concrete 3D printer, which he used to build a livable house in less than 24 hours. An entire village in Italy is even in the process of being 3D printed.

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[Photo: Ossip van Duivenbode]

Needless to say, it appears that 3D printing technology is quickly becoming a very viable tool for architects and designers to plan, prototype, and even actualize their wildest dream structures. One of the most ambitious of these 3D printed construction projects is the Canal House, a 3D printed house in Amsterdam that is currently being created by the Dutch studio DUS Architects. The architecture firm also designed the 3D printed entranceway for the collaborative Europe Building project, which is a 3D printed, recyclable building that was erected to temporarily host official meetings organized by the Dutch ministries during the Netherlands’ six-month presidency of the Council of the European Union. And, although they are still working through the final stages of their three-year Canal House endeavor, that hasn’t stopped DUS Architects from utilizing 3D printing technology for other smaller, yet equally innovative projects.

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[Photo: Sophia van den Hoek]

The group’s latest feat in architecture is the 3D Print Urban Cabin, which is a relatively small 3D printed cabin created with sustainable bio-plastic material. The 3D printed cabin is situated within a former industrial area of Amsterdam, and is accompanied by a 3D printed outdoor bathtub. The Urban Cabin is part of a broader project called 3D Print Living It, which was launched by DUS Architects in order to explore the use of 3D printing for affordable and sustainable tailor-made architecture within urban environments.

According to the DUS Architects team, the Urban Cabin is made of a black “bio print” material that is able to be shredded down and reused for new designs. The bio-material utilizes linseed oil as its main component, and was developed in collaboration between the DUS Architects team and the UK-based consumer manufacturing company Henkel, The cabin is certainly a small structure, with a total area measuring out to just 25 cubic meters. Still, the 3D printed cabin is extremely structurally sound, which is aided by the angular protrusions that are patterned throughout the design.

Photograph by Sophia van den Hoek

[Photo: Sophia van den Hoek]

The design team also utilized a small amount of concrete for the flooring surface, which infills a patterned grid and stretches out into the pebbled pathway arranged outside of the cabin. Though the miniaturized 3D printed cabin only has enough room for a twin-sized bed, the team made sure to add a mini-porch to the design, as well as a 3D printed bath placed in the garden beside the structure.

The Urban Cabin was designed by Hans Vermeulen, Martine de Wit, Hedwig Heinsman, Martijn van Wijk, Inara Nevskaya, Ivo Toplak, Peter Hudac, and Foteini Setaki, and was 3D printed and assembled with help from Jasper Harlaar, Sven de Haan, Ina Cheibas, Joe Platt, and Nathalie Swords.

According to the team, the 3D printed getaway can be booked for a short stay, enabling people to escape the city life without ever actually leaving Amsterdam. As for DUS Architects, the Urban Cabin project serves as additional proof that this group of Dutch designers are among the most innovative in the modern architecture industry. Discuss further over in the 3D Printed Cabin forum over at 3DBP.com.

[Sources: Dezeen / Plastics Today]

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