Inkbit

Materialise’s 3DP Academy Introduces 3D Printing in Hands-On Manner

Eplus3D

Share this Article

3dpa-4If you are a seasoned 3D printer, how did you get started learning all the ins and outs of the technology? Were you lucky enough to have it introduced by a friend, who also learned it from a friend? Were you fortunate to be able to take a course featuring the technology in college? Were you introduced to it through work as an architect, engineer, or manufacturer? In the past, the 3D printing space was more tied to specific technology sectors, and this, in addition to the price and size of the machines, tended to keep 3D printing away from the general public. As all technology becomes more sophisticated and user-friendly, it becomes easier to learn on our own. But informative workshops and classes are becoming more and more common. Since there’s such an emphasis on open source sharing in the space, people are attracted to learning about the technology collectively. This is where an educational entity like Materialise’s 3DP Academy comes into play.

mat2

3DP Academy hosts sessions focused on various aspects of 3D printing, with an emphasis on the co-creative aspects of the technology. In November, Sheffield, England hosted its first Materialise UK 3DP Academy session, and engineers, designers, manufacturers, and other interested individuals enthusiastically participated. To give you an idea of how one of these Academy sessions goes, here’s a brief review of the day. First there was a presentation from Materialise Business Development Manager Iain Hill on how businesses can identify projects or parts that can be complemented by additive manufacturing. Then Research and Development Manager Toon Roels took over and covered technological processes, their materials, and their properties.

3dpa-3One 3D printing student, Bennett Engineering’s Craig Harbron, shared insights about his Academy experience and the emphasis on design in 3D printing:

“It’s interesting to learn that we should spend more on the design time rather than the choice of materials or the manufacturing technology. That’s not necessarily the most important part, but spending more on what is the purpose of the part, what the life span should be and what you are trying to achieve.”

Of course, no 3D printing class would be complete without printed models and parts, and there were plenty of those on hand for students to view. Also, metal 3D printing turned out to be a hot topic of the day, and people were a bit surprised at how it compared to and exceeded the strength of traditional manufacturing’s finished products.

3dpa-2Additive manufacturing case studies were presented that covered programmable robots, grippers, and automation solutions. The final session of the day covered Materialise’s 3D Print Barometer, which is a tool for engineers and manufacturers to gauge whether a part is fit to be 3D printed. Participants engaged in a hands-on activity with the Barometer by drawing a part they would like to be 3D printed. When a part is run through the Barometer, five properties are evaluated for printing suitability: project value, series volume, size, complexity, and purpose. The part gets an overall percentage score for its fit with 3D printing, and needless to say, there were plenty of great ideas in the room that day!

If this sounds like something you are interested in for yourself or for an in-house workplace session, you can contact the 3DP Academy here. You can also view a video about the 3DP Academy session below.  Discuss this story in the 3DP Academy forum thread on 3DPB.com.

 

Share this Article


Recent News

Dual Takeovers: Solid Solutions Secures 3DPRINTUK and 3DVerkstan

KASK Officially Introduces New Elemento Helmet with 3D Printed Technology



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

3D Printing Financials: Profits Elude, Revenues Rally in MKFG, XMTR, AM3D, and DM Earnings Reports

In the first quarter of the year, Markforged (NYSE: MKFG), Xometry (NASDAQ: XMTR), and SLM Solutions (AM3D: Xetra) all reported increasing revenues, which is a positive sign of growing market...

Monster Energy Yamaha MotoGP Signs Three-Year 3D Printing Deal with Roboze

Roboze, an additive manufacturing (AM) leader in super polymers and composite materials, has entered a three-year technical collaboration with the Monster Energy Yamaha MotoGP team, beginning in 2023 and running...

Ulendo’s $1M NSF Grant Will Expand its Software to New 3D Printers

3D printing software startup, Ulendo just scooped up $1 million dollars from the National Science Foundation (NSF) program known as America’s Seed Fund, bringing the company’s fundraising total to over...

3D Printed Compostable Clay Cup Startup Bags $6.5M in Seed Round

Berlin-based startup GaeaStar has found a solution to single-use plastics. Using a “drink to dust” technology, the business 3D prints clay containers that don’t require recycling. Inspired by 5,000-year-old Indian...