Ford 3D Prints The 2015 Mustang Out Of Chocolate

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It seems like everyone is jumping onto the 3D printing bandwagon these days, if only for promotional purposes. Ford is the latest to add their name to the growing list of companies working with 3D printing technology. They however, use it both for manufacturing, and for cute little promos like this one.

chocolate-ford-mustang-6-1For Valentines’ Day, which is tomorrow, Ford has decided to 3D print a tiny model of their new 2015 Mustang. They are doing this to highlight the fact that they use 3D printers in the production of their real vehicles as well.

For example they used 3D printing to produce several parts for the new Mustang which include:

  • Interior components such as air vents, panels and siding, and dashboard applications
  • Engine parts such as cylinder head, intake manifold and engine block for the 2.3-liter EcoBoost® engine
  • Exterior parts such as the fascia and grille, taillights and hood vents

For this project, Ford teamed up with 3D Systems, and their newly acquired, Sugar Labs, out of LA.

“We wanted to create something fun to show that while 3D printing made these edible Mustangs, manufacturing-level 3D printing was used in the development of Ford’s all-new sports car,” said Paul Susalla, Ford’s supervisor of 3D printing.

As you will see from the video below they first produced a plastic version of the car, 4 inches long by 2 inches high. From there they took it up a level and printed it out of a chocolate sugar substance.  Layer by layer the printer deposits a tiny amount of powder sugar, and then heated water which crystalizes that layer of sugar. Eventually the entire edible car is printed out.

If you want to eat a Ford Mustang this Valentine’s Day, you may be out of luck. Ford only printed a few of these, and doesn’t plan on printing them in mass quantity.

Talk About Fords 3D Printed Mustang

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