Flow Visualization: 3D Printed Device Bonded to Organ Can Change How We Study Tissue

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Researchers at Virginia Tech have been working to 3D print bio-inspired devices for monitoring of whole organs. This video shows the flow of fluid through the 3D printed device while it is bonded to a whole kidney. Read more about this research and its implications at 3DPrint.com: Find the VA Tech paper here: https://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2017/lc/c7lc00468k#!divAbstract [Video provided by VA Tech]

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