Co(de)Factory, 3D Printed Interactive Art, Part of Google’s DevArt Exhibition

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Artists have been using 3D printing for years now to allow for the fabrication of ideas which otherwise might have only remained in their minds. 3D printing gives an artist a tool, unlike any other, to expand their range of art-4works, and apply new, innovative ideas that many would have never thought possible.

One Artist though, by the name of Karsten Schmidt is not only using 3D printing for the fabrication of his work, but is using it in a totally unique manner, which will allow for those admiring his work to actually participate in it. Schmidt currently has his work, ‘Co(de)Factory‘, on display in Google’s DevArt exhibition at the Barbican Centre, in London, England. The entire idea of Google’s exhibit is to feature works of art which have been created with technology and code. In total, three artists were selected by Google to take part in this exciting exhibition.

Schmidt’s project, which is unlike that of anything you have seen before, certainly follows the criteria above, in that coding is involved. The exhibit is a giant 3D printed piece. If that’s not impressive enough, then the fact that visitors to the exhibition will have the opportunity to actually design a part of it, certainly is.

Schmidt's 3D Printed Piece

Schmidt’s 3D Printed Piece

Using a set of custom developed in-browser 3D modeling tools, those viewing the exhibit, as well those remotely connected via a tablet or computer, will be able to create their own designs, or collaborate with others to art-3form designs which could be 3D printed and added to the exhibition. How you may ask? There will be a large open source, stereolithography based 3D printer within the actual exhibition. Each day, one design will be selected and will slowly be fabricated out of resin, in front of those visiting the museum. Once printed, that item will be a permanent fixture within the co(de)factory exhibition. As time goes by, more and more objects will make up the entire piece of work, allowing for a constantly adapting piece of art.

“Being able to actually watch something emerge out of nothingness rather than just be presented with the final object we are able to some the entire process from beginning to end,” explained Schmidt.

The amazing work of Schmidt and three other artists, Zach Lieberman’s ‘Play the World’, and Varvara Guljajeva and Mar Canet’s ‘Wishing Wall’ will be on display at the Barbican in London until September 15th. If you can’t make it to London, the exhibit will be touring the world for up to five years. All the work can also be found online as well.

What do you think about this unique way of artistic interaction? Have you visited Schmidt’s piece? Let us know your thoughts in the Co(de)Factory forum thread on 3DPB.com. Check out the brief video interview of Schmidt explaining his work below.

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