AMR

Help REMAKE 3D Printing with the 3D Hubs Failed Print Contest

Share this Article

remake3d3D Hubs is convinced that digital manufacturing through 3D printing will become the “factories of the future.” The idea is that by enabling consumer products to be made on-demand – and much closer to the point of purchase – waste can be eliminated, and overproduction and transport costs can be cut back.

Now 3D Hubs is looking forward again in their efforts to accelerate the trip to the future by opening up their first three recycling Hubs in London, Breda, and Boston.

It all comes down to what happens to failed prints. They say 3D printing has been branded as a way to reduce the impact technology and consumer products have on the environment, and this initiative focuses on the negative impact failed prints might have.

“Here at 3D Hubs, we want to stop this waste and change the way we produce things. As the biggest network for 3D printing we’re most likely also the biggest producer of failed prints,” says Filemon Schoffer of the 3D Hubs team. “3D printing holds great promise for a more sustainable way of manufacturing, so we thought it was about time to give those fails a second chance.”

3D-Hubs-logo-verticalHe says the Recycling Hubs, equipped with both a Filamaker shredder and a Filabot extruder, will take failed prints from the community via a series of events, and then turn the waste into brand new filament which will ultimately make its way back into 3D printing community for re-use.

As a way to raise awareness for the campaign, 3D Hubs is kicking off REMAKE, and it’s a way for the 3D printing community to share their biggest 3D printing fails.

To make it happen, users can post a picture of a failed print as a comment here, or share a pic on social media with the #REMAKE3D hashtag.

The Hub with the most popular failed print will receive a fully recycled spool of filament produced by Refil, and the campaign will run until September 9th.

The mayors of  the Hubs — @CharlotteJ in Breda, @AtomJaay in Boston, and @Charlotte @Cinter in London — will be tasked with opening up the first three recycling Hubs, and it will be their job to collect the failed prints of their community and turn the waste into brand new filament.

The group now has more than 21,500 3D printers in their worldwide network, spanning over 150 countries, and 3D Hubs offers an affordable, local and quick way to have your designs 3D printed and into your hands.

Will you enter a pic of any of your failed 3D prints in this contest from 3D Hubs? Let us know in the 3D Hubs Failed Print Contest on 3DPB.com.

 

Share this Article


Recent News

3D Printing Webinar and Event Roundup: July 21, 2024

3D Printing News Briefs, July 20, 2024: Aerospace Certification, 3D Printed House, & More



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

Al Arkan to 3D Print in Saudi and Beyond, Interview with Tarek Alhalabi

Dar Al Arkan is a Saudi-listed real-estate company that has built over 15,000 homes as well as malls, planned developments, and luxury villas. Active in eight countries, including Saudi Arabia,...

ICON’s New Wimberley Springs Project to Feature 3D Printed Homes from CODEX Catalog

Additive construction (AC) firm ICON continues to push forward America’s homebuilding industry. Now, the firm announced a project consisting of eight single-family homes for the community of Wimberly Springs, Texas....

3D Printing Webinar and Event Roundup: July 14, 2024

We’ve got a busy week of 3D printing webinars and events, both virtual and in-person! Stratasys continues its training and tour, while a Laser Additive Manufacturing workshop will be held...

3D Printing Markets Grows 8% Year over Year

Despite a market slowdown in 2023, the additive manufacturing (AM) sector continues to grow at a robust rate, according to AM Research. The market analysis firm published its Q1 2024...