3D Printed Semi-automatic Ruger Charger Pistol is Assembled and Fired – ‘If you take my gun, I’ll print another!’

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ruger1When 3D printing is discussed, one of the most debated topics is that of 3D printed weaponry, specifically guns. Last year, Solid Concepts created a 3D Printed replica of a 1911 pistol. At the time, it brought up quite a bit of debate, as the 3D printing of guns could severely undermine national and world-wide security. If anyone with a 3D printer could print an operational gun, then what good are laws that prevent people from obtaining guns?

Today’s consumer level 3D printers can, for the most part, only print in plastic or plastic-like materials. Many people argue that guns made of plastic couldn’t possibly fire muliple shots, without putting the person behind the trigger in great danger. Back in May, we reported on a man in Japan that was arrested for owning five 3D printed guns. He was an official at a well known university, and had fired his 3D printed weapons on video, and then posted those videos on video repository, Rumble.

Over the past year, there have been many gun parts created using 3D printers. Today comes news of yet another.

This time, a person that goes by the moniker, “Buck O’Fama’, claims to have 3D printed the receiver for a semi-automatic Ruger Charger pistol. The Ruger Charger comes standard with 10-round flush magazines, and can accept high-capacity magazines that hold 30 rounds or more. While the entire gun was not 3D printed, the receiver was. The rest of the parts, can be, and were purchased on the internet without the need for legal paperwork.  This means that anyone, whether they are a highly dangerous criminal, or your average Joe Schmo, could print out this gun’s receiver and then assemble the complete weapon, like the one picture below, quite easily.

ruger-featured

Buck O’Fama claims that the receiver was printed on an inexpensive, small format 3D printer, in 2 sections, and then those sections were crazy-glued together. “This gun doesn’t exist in any government database,” said O’Fama.

The receiver prior to being crazy-glued together

The receiver prior to being crazy-glued together

In the video, seen below, he is shown firing at least 30 rounds using this semi-automatic pistol. At the end of the video, O’Fama makes the following declaration:

“You may not condone the activity, but the fact remains that we are now living in a time when deadly weapons can be printed with the push of a button. The notion that any item so easily created could be eradicated from the earth is pure fantasy. The capacity to defend my family is a fundamental human right. If you take my gun, I will simply print another one. “

This certainly isn’t the last we will see of 3D printed guns. It’s an issue that we will increasingly be made aware of as governments around the world try and come up with a solution, to not only crack down on 3D printed guns, but other weapons as well. There are those individuals that feel it is their god given right to own and create their own guns, while others feel that it is putting us all in danger. One thing is for sure though, even though we will begin to see more and more 3D printable gun files become available on the internet in the coming months, and years, remember that because it works for one person, doesn’t mean that it couldn’t back-fire on you.

What do you think about this 3D printed gun? Is it a step in a deadly direction, or simply an aspect of modern technology that we will all learn to live with? Discuss in the 3D Printed Ruger Charger forum thread on 3DPB.com

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