Metal Binder Jetting
Automotive Polymers

Blueprinter M3 — Powerful & Quiet Selective Heat Sintering 3D Printer is Unveiled

Share this Article

blThe Blueprinter development process began in 2008 when Frederik Tjellesen and Anders Hartmann, as engineering students at the Technical University of Denmark, wrote a thesis which attempted to demonstrate that it would be possible to make 3D printers available to smaller businesses. At the time, few companies were prepared to take on the costs involved in printing 3D prototypes, but Tjellesen and Hartmann were determined to make the technology available to manufacturers, architects, engineers and educational institutions.

As the pair began their manufacturing efforts in 2009, little did they know it would be another three years until the first Blueprinter was introduced to the public in Birmingham. But by summer 2013, the pair had completed their first beta program and twelve printers were installed.

As of January 2014, the team had made the first Blueprinter available to the market. Now the Danish 3D printing pioneers have launched the next generation of their machine.

blueprinter-m3

This latest machine, Blueprinter M3, includes smoother lines and an increased build volume.  It’s also been highly  optimized for daily use and to be much more user-friendly. The company says the noise output of the M3 has been reduced by some 60% meaning that it is now as quiet as a standard 2D printer – and it uses less power as well. Additionally, enhanced mechanisms used to drive the powder shovels and new powder drawers make the M3 more capable of printing accurate and more detailed parts. An increased build volume – now 200mm x 157mm x 150mm – allows for the production of multiple parts in a single print run as well.

Frederik Tjellesen and Anders Hartmann

Frederik Tjellesen and Anders Hartmann

Last but not least, a stiffer chassis has been developed which represents a 40% improvement over the previous version, a new lid hinge mechanism with damping has been installed and the company says that this latest design improves service access for maintenance tasks as well.

The M3 uses what the company calls SHS – Selective Heat Sintering –  a technology which utilizes a thermal printhead rather than the laser used in a typical SLS machine. This thermal printhead applies heat to layers of thermoplastic powder within the build chamber and is capable of building objects with complex geometrical shapes which feature a minimum wall thickness of 1 mm.

Blueprinter says that, once a print run is complete, the entire build can be removed and the printer resets to begin printing again within 5 minutes.  The Blueprinter M3, the cleaning station and 12 kgs of M-Flex powder retail for € RRP 25,450.00 or a little over $28,000, putting this machine somewhere in the middle of the 3D printer market.  Let us know your thoughts on this new machine in the Blueprinter M3 forum thread on 3DPB.com.  Be sure to check out the video below:

 

Share this Article


Recent News

3D Printing News Briefs, August 10, 2022: Events, Awards, & More

3D Printed Robotic Hand Mimics Human Movement



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

3D Printing News Briefs, May 4, 2022: Construction, Research, & More

We’re going to tell you about a 3D printed pavilion and a 3D printed set of stairs first in today’s 3D Printing News Briefs. Moving on, Triastek has received FDA...

Biodegradable Soft Robot Finger Provides Peek at Circular Economy with 3D Printing

Last week, while discussing a new printing filament partially made from wheat bran waste, I mentioned that greater exploration of biodegradable printing materials could be the best long-term solution for...

RAPID + TCT 2021 Day 2: 3D Printing with Inkbit, Farsoon, AON3D, & Raise3D

At the recent RAPID + TCT 2021 in Chicago, I had the opportunity to attend keynote presentations, interview several industry companies, watch an awards ceremony, and walk the show floor....

3D Printed Chain Mail Flexes and Stiffens on Demand

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and California Institute of Technology (Caltech) researchers have created a polyamide chain mail which is flexible but can harden when needed. Made out of...