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New Trestle 3D Printer Offers Sizeable Build Volume, Easy Upgrades & More

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store_logoSimple. Powerful. Affordable parts. Easy to upgrade. Are these terms that appeal to you when looking for a 3D printer? If so, you’ll want to check out the Trestle 3D printer from Dionysus Design. This is a machine that’s centered on your needs, the parts you want to use, and–best of all–your budget. You have your choice of electronics and can put together a variety of configurations for this open-source 3D printer.

trestleWhile this may be a simple, affordable 3D printer, it offers size–designed in a tower, delta-style machine–and a massive framework and build area if you’ve got some big ideas in mind, boasting a build volume of 12″ x 8″, offering more than 2000 cubic inches of build space.

“This printer can really build some large items,” says Dan Jones, who points out that his team at Dionysus Designs just printed out a detailed Iron Man helmet that took about 70 hours in total printing, due to its many parts. “The Trestle is up for it.”

Upgrading is the name of the game here with off-the-shelf parts. You’ve got the framework and the size–with all the options in your court. You may have your own components in mind for items like print heads as an example, with the Trestle offering expandability from one to three heads.

You can change out the sliders depending on your preference, whether that’s components from open source builds, or maybe a linear slide; also, they are designed so you can use either three or four bearings, depending on precision requirements, as well as budget. You can use any off-the-shelf components you prefer.

The Trestle is also extremely quiet.

“The extruder, stepper motor, as well as the power supply fan are the loudest components on this printer,” says Jones. “The ABS plastic frame parts as well as the aluminum frame parts really don’t vibrate much when in operation, so you don’t hear the whining of the stepping motors as its moving.

“You can run this in the house and really not be bothered by it.”

four - partDue to the use of magnetic balls, there is no backlash in the arm area, which allows for a simple and solid interface with the Trestle 3D printer. Jones uses aluminum tubing, but you can use carbon fiber rods. Aluminum is good due to the lightweight quality, as well as price. The valve adjustment offers a screw which can be both tightened and loosened for tension requirements as well.

Jones plans to keep working on the Trestle, with some further upgrades in the future, like:

  • Using a tilting method during multiple extrusions to allow the hot-end that’s not printing to be lifted up so it wouldn’t interfere with the part being printed.
  • Adding new and different electronic options like a touch screen capability to make the printer all inclusive with downloading, slicing, and 3D printing.

Jones is committed and excited about the open-source design, looking forward to further improvements and ideas that users of the Trestle have.

“I’d really like to see what the community can do to help improve this printer,” says Jones. “I’d like to see what other ideas are out there to see this become a high-end, adaptable, customizable platform for all 3D printing possibilities.”

Discuss this new 3D printer in the Trestle 3D Printer forum thread over at 3DPB.com.

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