In Support of Top Gear’s Jeremy Clarkson, a Hilarious 3D Printed ‘Hungry Hungry Clarksons’ Game Emerges

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For those fans of Top Gear, and particularly Jeremy Clarkson, surely you have been following the scandal of sorts which has put the English broadcaster in the spotlight. For those unfamiliar with what is going on, Clarkson has been suspended by BBC following a reported “fracas” that he had with a producer, after he couldn’t get a hot meal served to him proceeding the filming of the show. Fans of the Top Gear show, which has been ongoing since 1977, and has an audience of over 350 million worldwide, have hit the internet with a petition to reinstate the popular broadcaster. So far this petition has been signed by over 970,000 fans.

Meanwhile there have been other controversies that have arisen, as allegations come out that two of the BBC’s most senior executives have compared Clarkson to Jimmy Savile, another famed TV broadcaster who was accused of sexual assault a few years ago. Clarkson is furious and so are his fans who don’t want to see Top Gear either go off the air or go on without him.

Don’t worry though, for those of you who are missing Clarkson’s presence on your television screens, there is now a solution to getting your Jeremy Clarkson fix, and at the same time provide Clarkson the food that he deserves (sort of). Portishead, Bristol based 3D printer manufacturer CEL Robox, has used their 3D printers to create quite the hilarious, yet entertaining game.

Most of us are familiar with the tabletop game ‘Hungry Hungry Hippos’. You know, the one produced by Hasbro that was extremely popular in the late 70s and 80s. The idea of the game is to get your hippo to eat more marbles than your competitors. The 10 minutes of excitement that this game brought to families around the world is unforgettable.

Well now, instead of hippos eating marbles, you can play with Jeremy Clarkson heads in their place.

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“The enterprising folks at CEL are big Jeremy Clarkson/Top Gear fans, and were saddened that the poor fellow couldn’t get the steak he deserved after a hard day of filming last week,” Colin Myer, Campaign Director for Cel Robox’s PR tells 3DPrint.com. “By way of consolation they used the Robox 3D printer they’ve invented to create a special version of the classic board game, Hungry Hungry Hippos. Now the whole family can feed Jeremy by playing Hungry Hungry Clarksons”

Anyone who owns a 3D printer can enjoy the fun of playing Hungry Hungry Clarksons, in the same manner that they remember playing the original game back in the 80s. Cel Robox has made the design for Clarkson’s head available for free download on MyMiniFactory.com, and once printed, can be added onto the classic ‘Hungry Hungry Hippos’ tabletop game.

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“Families interested in *upgrading* their Hungry Hungry Hippo sets merely need to download the part and get printing,” explains Myer.

While CEL Robox manufactures their own Robox 3D printer which they say is the “first truly plug and print 3D printer for the home”, these designs can be printed out on virtually any FFF-based 3D printer.

What do you think about this unique creation, in support of Jeremy Clarkson? Will you be printing these heads yourself? Do you even have a version of Hungry Hungry Hippos laying around your house? Discuss in the Hungry Hungry Clarksons forum thread on 3DPB.com.

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