YouMagine Creates Standard 3D Printing License, Asks for Feedback of Beta Version

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youmagine-logo.508x112-8394db9a39ff30939c570542b2a79cb0As some legal issues, copyright ‘discussions,’ and licensing questions begin to sprout up here and there regarding 3D printing in a community that has been mostly carefree and self-governing, it’s a relief and a joy to see a company like YouMagine taking the initiative to put licensing guidelines out there for discussion — before anyone can throw down the gauntlet and take advantage of a game with no previous rules.

OlivierSketch4After working on a 3D Printing License (3DPL) for months, YouMagine has come up with a thorough outline to present to the 3D printing and maker community that allows for a hopeful world where everyone can experience the most creative latitude and freedom possible, along with sharing designs and enjoying the work of others — without stepping on each other’s toes. They stress that the 3DPL is still considered to be in beta and is for everyone to comment on and provide feedback.

“We want people to build upon previous technologies, improve them, remix them and individualize them. We wish to create the preconditions for a 3D printed world where all the stuff in the world is iteratively and fluidly collectively improved. The 3DPL is a part of our effort to make all the things in the world malleable,” states the YouMagine team.

“Please give us feedback. Tell us what doesn’t make sense to you, what you hate, what we should change. Please involve others. We’re especially interested in home 3D printer users, companies that use 3D printing, lawyers, people from the wider open source community, inventors, artists, designers, makers and creators in the broadest sense….feel free also to ask questions or discuss it…”

In a wonderfully refreshing way to establish some sense of order, and make sure credit is given as it is deserved and in the manner requested by designers, YouMagine is taking care of the community rather than ruling it — allowing for a mature, respectful community of artists. While the 3DPL does impose structure, the whole idea is encourage designing and sharing. With licensing structure available, their mission is to continue to watch innovations being contributed to the world through 3D printing.

The general idea is very simple: “Each 3D printing design file you upload under this 3DPL remains your intellectual property. This 3DPL allows you to decide under which conditions others are allowed to use your design.”

ultimakerThe general idea is that the 3DPL works as preconditions, prohibits disallowed copying or selling, and gives credit to originators. Designs must be ‘attributed,’ with varying forms of that, depending on what creators of designs ask for. Your subsequent ‘remixes’ must be available for further remixing and sharing too. Those operating under the license are quite obviously expected to respect the wishes of others, and licensing can be rescinded if they do not.

References from the creator are meant to stay in the files, even after the creator has stopped distributing the design. The original creators are to be given credit, and whatever processes they require in terms of adding references, name, logo, etc., must be followed.

There are also financial repercussions for not abiding by the license in terms of selling something not allowed for commercial use – in which case you must “pay the creator 3 times the gross revenue you made on the sale.” Arbitration processes will also be part of issues with licensing, should that be required.

The 3DPL comes in three forms:

REMIX: Derivative work must be available to remix and share by others.

REMIX — NON COM: Design files are completely restricted to non-commercial use.

REMIX — RIGHTS MELT:  REMIX — NON COM design file is available as a non-commercial share-alike file for 12 months, and then reverts back to a REMIX.

YouMagine will hosting a Google Hangout on March 17th at 8 p.m. CET. This is a crucial opportunity to contribute essential ideas and give feedback as YouMagine will work with their lawyers afterward to consider everything and incorporate all appropriate, possible items into the final version of the 3DPL. As they point out, since there is currently no other licensing standard, this may end up being the only one. Period.

As they say at YouMagine, it’s very important for everyone to get on board, read over the current 3DPL, and get involved, because “it would suck if the 3DPL sucked.” You can’t get any plainer than that.

YouMagine is a 3D printing community dedicated to design, collaboration between designers, and taking the opportunity to “show the world what you’ve got.” Powered by Ultimaker, while they have many designs for sale, they encourage everyone to try their hand at making 3D models, with the help of their streamlined, user-friendly tools.

Will you check out the Google Hangout? Let us know what sort of feedback you might have to offer YouMagine over at the YouMagine Beta Tests 3D Printing Licensing Agreement forum thread at 3DPB.com.

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