AM Investment Strategies
AMS Spring 2023

Security Program in the Works to Combat 3D Printing Piracy, and Gun Making

Formnext

Share this Article

A Japanese 3D-printing firm has created a new security program that aims to block the production of unauthorized and pirated 3D-printed products.

dnpDai Nippon Printing (DNP), which is among Japan’s most prominent 3D-printing companies, hopes its new software will stop people from manufacturing items that are illegal such as firearms.The software would also block the reproduction of copyrighted brands, characters and emblems. DNP also says the software can even accurately identify modified logos and designs, as well as objects printed by other 3D printers.

“From the data to the production at a 3D printer, this security program is designed to determine high-speed products that require permission or legal authorization, whether (black list products),” a statement from the company says.

Even though the software will have a database of information to look through to identify a match, DNP says that the program won’t diminish the performance of a 3D printer or slow down the printing process.

A graphic showing what Dai Nippon Printing's new software will be able to do.

A graphic showing what Dai Nippon Printing’s new software will be able to do.

According to DNP, the program works by putting STL data in control. By accessing a colossal database of algorithms, patterns, and raw 3D data, the program will be able to analyze STL file data from sources such as scanners, CAD/CAM designs and data obtained from certain 3D objects.

Though the internal features of the program have not been specified, DNP plans to show it at the Japanese Society of Printing Science this month. The company says it hopes that the software will be ready to use on a global scale by 2017.

Recently Japan arrested a man named Yoshitomo Imura for being in possession of five 3D printed firearms.  Imura claimed that he was not aware of any laws prohibiting the 3D printing of plastic guns, but agreed that if the guns were considered legitimate firearms, then his arrest may have been warranted.  Such a computer program will likely be able to stop those who are unaware that what they are printing is illegal, however those who really want to print a gun will likely find ways around the program’s defenses. What do you think?  Will there be a place for defensive software like DNP’s?  Will this make the world a safer place, or just give us a false sense of security?  Share your thoughts at the 3D printing software thread about this program.

dnp1

3D Printed Guns Found in Imura’s Apartment in Japan

Share this Article


Recent News

3D Printing News Unpeeled: SLM Solutions 1 Meter Build Volume System & LEGO

Mobility | Medical goes Additive Announces MGA Annual Meeting & Women in AM Summit 2022



Categories

3D Design

3D Printed Art

3D Printed Food

3D Printed Guns


You May Also Like

3D Printing Webinar and Event Roundup: September 18, 2022

In this week’s roundup of webinars and events in the 3D printing industry, Stratasys and Markforged continue their tours, and ASTM International’s CoE is holding a snapshot workshop. HP will...

Driving Sustainability in Commercial & Public Transportation with 3D Printing

With the advent of the pandemic just two short years ago, we’ve been forced to quickly learn how easily economic sustainability can be disturbed. Its negative impact on supply chains...

Leading Women in Manufacturing Inducted to WiMEF’s Hall of Fame

Seeking to recognize women making outstanding contributions to the manufacturing industry, the Women in Manufacturing Education Foundation (WiMEF) inducted 13 women leaders to its 2022 class of Women in Manufacturing...

3D Printing Webinar and Event Roundup: August 7, 2022

Things are picking up a little in terms of 3D printing webinars and events this week! Fortify will be at the SmallSat Conference, ASTM is continuing its virtual certificate course,...