One Stay-At-Home Mom’s Piping Hot 3D Printed Cookie Cutter Business

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Playstation, X-Box and Wii Controller Cookies

Playstation, X-Box and Wii Controller Cookies made with 3D Printed Cookie Cutters

One stay-at-home mom in Bend, Oregon, decided to make the most of her time and 3D design skills, and started her own 3D printed cookie cutter company. Athey Moravetz, whose husband is also a partner in the business, has definitely found her company’s niche: The vast world of geekiness that loves nothing more than being immersed in its favorite pop culture corner of the geek universe.

Game of Thrones Targaryen House Sigil cookie cutter, which sells for $6. Better yet, buy the full set of sigils.

Game of Thrones House Targaryen Sigil cookie cutter, which sells for $6.

Moravetz’s company, WarpZone Prints LLC, operates solely via the web and claims it can ship its products pretty much anywhere in the world there’s a quirky cookie baker in need (or, really, want). WarpZone offers a staggering amount of choices to its customers. There seem to be hundreds of options, including ensembles of cookie cutters of characters from popular television shows like “Archer,” “Doctor Who,” the BBC’s “Sherlock” (for the more cerebral geeks), “Game of Thrones,” and even “Breaking Bad.” We suspect “My Little Pony” is a hit with the younger crowd in the Moravetz house as there are at least ten options in that regard, including a set of especially tiny Little Ponies.

And then there are miscellaneous other truly cleverly designed and colorful, 3D printed cookie cutters, some more complex than others. Some of my favorites are the Michael Myers Halloween cookie, the Monty Python Black Knight and its accompanying Holy Grail, an NES controller, a Captain Picard face palm, the Shao Lin Monk Kung Fu cutter, a Neal Degrasse Tyson cutter, and the Tetris blocks. In addition to the pop culture-themed cutters, Moravetz offers a variety of other, miscellaneous-themed ones like Celtic knots, bachelorette lingerie, snowflakes and leaves, a brain, a Converse sneaker, a slice of bacon, and even the bio-hazard symbol.

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Doctor Who themed cookie cutters, with the set of five selling for $25.

Moravetz, formerly a professional 3D designer in the video game industry, says she uses “a small army of 3D printers” — at last count, she was up to 12 — as well as an industrial laser cutter to produce her massive assortment of very affordable cookie cutters. Moravetz includes information on her production process — from designing in Maya to printing on her MakerBot Replicator 3D printers — on the company’s FAQ page.

The average single cutter sells for around $5 and sets cost a bit more depending on their complexity and numbers. Her skill as a designer is evident in many of the cookie cutters, which are not your grandmother’s basic templates, but rather produce more intricate cookies, severing edges and imprinting details in the dough.

While the cookie cutters are the central focus of Moravetz’s company, WarpZone Prints also has other offerings like laser-cut clocks, coasters, and jewelry in a variety of themes, including the omnipresent “Doctor Who.” All seem to be part of an effort to keep her laser-cutting skills honed and the cookie cutters really are the stars in this successful home business’s firmament.

Would these pop culture shapes be a hit in your home? Let us know what you think in the 3D Printed Cookie Cutters forum thread at 3DPB.com.

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