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FABMOBs Looks to Kickstarter for Support of Platform to 3D Print the Atmosphere

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download (2)We live in a world full of information and data. Economics. Analysis. Numbers. Problems to be solved. It can get a little dry, to say the least. Adding visual punch to the facts we need to absorb is always effective, and even better with FABMOBs’ new twist that attempts to meld science, innovation, and art.

FABMOBs wants to translate big data into design, and produce a tangible explanation through 3D printing. They believe that through producing “engaging content” they can unlock greater potential for a wide variety of professionals and artists, from educators to business owners and tradesman. FABMOBs’ idea is to process data into 3D models, 3D print it in stunning form, and produce an installation. Starting with the atmosphere. After a year of working as architects for this plan, and using their own funds, the FABMOBs team is reaching out to the community.

tile rewardsHaving just launched a Kickstarter campaign, FABMOBs plans to raise $10K with the goal in mind to use the funds to collect copious amounts of data, generate models, and roll out a large number of 3D printed examples on a deadline. Much of that process will include testing of their platform. As rewards, files will be available to supporters so that they can 3D print out their own “tiles,” which are the form that the ATMOStag vision takes in 3D after translating data. They refer to the 3D printed tiles as “visualizations.” Not only does the supporter receive the file to the tile, they receive the license to it as well.

Bringing new meaning to grabbing something out of thin air, FABMOBs’ first project is called ATMOStag, which they use to demonstrate a tangible version of the environment in which we live. But is it truly possible to combine all the elements of the atmosphere and 3D print it? Jamil Mehdaoui and Brad Kligerman of FABMBOBs believe it is, and they demonstrate their theory by building “a strong, innate connection between digital models and physical ones.”

workshopPutting together a veritable recipe of your surroundings, the FABMOBs team considers all the ingredients such as heat, moisture, light, auditory levels, and how much carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide are in the air. Using their unique algorithms, Mehdaoui and Kligerman are able to produce a 3D printed example, demonstrating mood — which is an atmosphere in its own right. And they are, basically, turning a math equation into a piece of art which can be used in a variety of cool ways. With ATMOStag and the 3D printing of the tiles, they plan to create a project almost like a puzzle with one designated local area and a multitude of 3D tiles translated into the whole of its geography.

They also plan to use Kickstarter funds to create a workflow pattern for makers and 3D printing enthusiasts, plans for exhibitions, and future creation of content.

Is the FABMOBs ATMOStag project something you are planning to support? What do you think of their vision combining data, equations, and 3D printed art? Tell us about it in the 3D Print the Atmosphere forum over at 3DPB.com.

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