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i3DMFG Picks Up 12 EOS M400-4 Metal 3D Printers

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Oregon-based Integrated Manufacturing (also referred to as i3DMFG or i3D) will buy 12 EOS M400-4 metal printers. In total, the company will now have 36 EOS metal and polymer systems in-house. Integrated is part of BTX Precision and a sister company to ERA Industries. ERA is a Chicago-based precision manufacturing service focusing on CNC for aerospace, medical, and defense industries. BTX Precision is a private equity-backed precision manufacturing consolidator. Once the metal printers are delivered (this year and into 2026), Integrated will be one of the largest metal 3D printing services in North America.

“i3D’s strong partnership with EOS has had a demonstrable impact on our ability to serve broad customer-based needs for complex metal additive components. The combination of forward-thinking, resiliency, reliability and best-in-class technology is at the forefront of why i3D continues to expand our relationship with EOS,” said i3DMFG CEO Erin Mastroni.

“This order is one of the largest single metal AM investments ever in North America. The fact that i3D is fully committed to EOS technology is extremely gratifying. i3D’s extraordinary team, led by Erin, has driven dynamic, ambitious growth. The reliability of EOS systems and services has been integral to their progress,” said There is an amazing collaborative bond between our two companies. Strong, supportive relationships at every level have helped create the path to today’s announcement,” said Glynn Fletcher, President of EOS North America.

i3DMFG has been using EOS machines since 2013 and sees opportunities in the aerospace and semiconductor industries. Those industries, along with the significant growth in rockets, satellites, and defense applications, are propelling both i3D’s and BtX’s dramatic growth in the high-precision manufacturing sector. The M400 has four 400-watt lasers and a full-field build volume of 400x400x400 mm. It’s a workhorse, allowing you to qualify parts on M290s and then produce them at scale on this larger machine easily.

The machine can now run copper, aluminum, and superalloys, which should be handy. i3DMFG can develop its own powders and runs GrCop, Hastelloy X, Monel K500, and other significant alloys. The M400 is an established force in manufacturing, but it’s still a bit curious why the company didn’t opt for the EOS AMCM 4K systems or even the 8K. The 4K has a 1m build height, which is especially handy for things like combustion chambers and other rocket-like components that i3DMFG is said to be targeting. The machine is popular with the New Space set and has been especially made for superalloys and copper. A bigger-ticket item, the 8K, would have also been an option, as would the 450 x 450 x 400 mm M450-4, which has easier-to-adjust settings and a quarter more build volume than the M400. Given i3DMFG’s expertise in custom alloys and the future applications that can be found there, that system may be easier to use.

One salient detail is that Ursa Major is an i3DMFG customer, and that firm’s success alone could have prompted this purchase. Apart from that, this move sheds light on several major trends in contract manufacturing and service bureaus. We are seeing consolidation in this space. The closing and disappearing of CNC shops in an already fragmented market has collided with a desire for the US to re-industrialize. Given the money now available in stimulus for semiconductor and defense sectors, as well as the long-term viability of the US manufacturing sector, private equity and other investments are pouring in.

At the same time, we can see a commoditization of the low end of the market. Platforms such as Xometry are hoovering up orders here. Meanwhile, in the high-end space and ITAR arena, we see differentiation and renewed investment in firms most likely to handle high-end rocket and defense work. Investment here is disproportional to the rest of the industry. We are also seeing a shift where “M400 is the new M290,” with companies moving to quad laser systems as the new standard and adopting bigger systems.

This seems like a solid move by i3DMFG to secure a stable position and expand its customer base in aerospace and defense with series production of critical parts. That is a desirable place to be and a lucrative business to have. As for EOS, this is a very welcome announcement indeed.

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