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DNA.am Acquires GROW Software, Protecting AM Data

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Our Mission: to overcome adoption methods of additive manufacturing surrounding design, manufacturing, and build validation.” – Grow.am

As an industry that has skyrocketed into the billions upon hitting the mainstream after decades of working behind the scenes for a select number of designers and engineers, 3D printing is continually being reshaped in terms of equipment and techniques—as well as through the emergence of new companies, mergers, and buy-outs.

Now, DNA.am is announcing the acquisition of the UK-headquartered GROW Software. To be re-branded Grow.am, they will carry on digitalizing security for sectors that are highly regulated, along with helping designers protect intellectual property in additive manufacturing.

(Image: GROW.am)

As additive manufacturing has evolved and led industrial users to become much more reliant, the need to explore security measures (especially as there may not currently be any in place at all) has become apparent for users seeking to protect critical data—and parts.

This acquisition occurs during a unique and challenging time for many, with the world facing the COVID-19 viral pandemic, the two companies are recognizing the further need for security, quality assurance, and material traceability. This is necessary to strengthen the 3D printing industry and technology further so that manufacturers can contribute more wholly in the future when supply chains are breaking down during the need for critical items like personal protective equipment.

In examining the current state of AM technology overall, DNA.am and Valuechain Group CEO Tom Dawes has expressed concern over “fragility and significant limitations” in conventional production methods. While additive manufacturing should have been ready to fill gaps in the supply chain during the pandemic more fully, there are still “major inhibitors.”

(Image: DNA.am)

The glories of 3D printing and design and fabrication of items like ventilators, masks, swabs, have been well-publicized; however, of course there must be concerns about safety, possible toxicity in materials, and true viability about a range of items being used or that are currently in the design process. While obviously there was not time to get FDA approval for numerous parts being fabricated in the maker community to help manufacture much-needed PPEs, as time passes, safety standards will fall into place.

Traceability in products along with the ability to enjoy secure partnerships in filling AM supply chains will be a focus for the team at GROW, led by Siavash Mahdavi, founder.

[Source / Images: 3D Adept Media]

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