miniFactory Makes FDM Specific Technical Datasheets with Validated Materials for PEI and PEKK

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Headquartered in Finland, miniFactory‘s progression toward offering high-performance FDM materials for users around the world, they are making significant strides toward making it easier to fabricate not just prototypes but also real end-use parts.

Recently, the miniFactory team released technical datasheets corresponding to parts fabricated on the miniFactory Ultra 3D printer, validating materials along with showing the repeatability of the process and real-life applications. As research and development progressed, they realized how critical it is for end-use parts to receive material validation but that should be printer specified, requiring the team to perform mechanical tests for the ultimate optimization for every material produced. The company now has three validated materials that along with the datasheets and corresponding settings should lead to repeatable results and predictable mechanical properties in parts. The company has released these Sabic ULTEM AM1010F filament, Sabic ULTEM AM9085F filament and PEKK-A made by Kimya from Kepstan PEKK by Arkema.

“To maintain the high repeatability that miniFactory Ultra 3D printer has, miniFactory is using certified materials,” shared the team in a press release sent to 3DPrint.com. “These materials provide full traceability and quality control for the end user.

“To be able to trust on the 3D printed part to be used in real life applications, it is crucial to know the mechanical properties of the print. This can be done only with repeatable process which is known. To achieve the demanded repeatability, the process needs to be stable. In order to achieve desired results in everyday use, the process needs to meet the validated parameters. These parameters are based on using a specific validated printer, optimized printing profiles and validated materials. By following the process, the customer can achieve the mechanical properties shown in the technical datasheets. By changing any of these three parameters, the process changes and the printed part might not match the technical datasheet.”

Each test for validating materials, parts, and printing profiles along with the resulting mechanical properties can be announced in a technical datasheet—several of which have been released with their press release.

The concept of using technical datasheets with each test is a trend that should be continued as these documents contain critical information that mechanical designers can use as helpful tools for identifying mechanical properties—an area of study that is key for so many users involved in 3D printing today as different hardware and materials may impact mechanical properties or different parameters may be required for specific projects. The datasheets are made according to the relevant ASTM standard and the material and 3D printing profiles that let you have repeatable results was a “long process” according to the firm.

“Until now, this has not been possible since the datasheets on the market are based on injection molded parts, or the datasheets have not been available at all,” stated the miniFactory team in their press release. “Values of injection molding are not valid when the part is created using 3D printing. This fact has had too little attention by the 3D printing industry and miniFactory wants to bring it to the spotlight.”

Their main goal continues to be providing 3D printers with reliable, repeatable processes. The developers at miniFactory are achieving this mission through offering comprehensive traceability of the 3D printing filament with technical datasheets—making certain that end-use parts are fabricated with quality, suitable mechanical properties, and the necessary durability. Find out more about this ongoing process regarding technical datasheets from miniFactory here.

MiniFactory has played a part in the 3D printing industry since 2013 and unveiled their own new 3D printers last year. What do you think of this 3D printing news? Let us know your thoughts! Join the discussion of this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com.

[Source / Images: MiniFactory]

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